Tag Archives: Rubina Azizdin

Rubina Azizdin: A REAL force of empowerment

By Sarayuth Pinthong

Knightly News Reporter

Rubina Azizdin, 35, founder of the Relationships, Empowerment, Authenticity, Laughter (REAL) networking group, continues to share her ethics and dealings with adversities that have made her an empowering female force in the Central Pennsylvania, and the Central Penn, community.

It doesn’t take much to find accolades recognizing Azizdin’s accomplishments throughout her life. Last year, she received the 2017 Shining Star Award from the West Shore Chamber of Commerce as part of its Luminary Awards, created by the Women in Business Roundtable Committee. She has been honored at least twice this year

Her background reveals connection with the Junior Board at the YWCA, West Shore Young Professionals, Central Pennsylvania Association of Female Executives, American Business Association, Board of the Pennsylvania Association of Colleges and Employers, and finally, Women’s Capital Area Networking, and that’s not all.

But to truly understand how Azizdin’s drive, determination and will contribute to her success, despite the obstacles, you must go back to where it all began.

The beginning

Rubina Azizdin, born Rubina Keval in Central Pa., is the oldest of four children. Growing up, Azizdin and her family would visit relatives in Africa. Her parents, Akbar Keval (father), from Ethiopia, and Ruksana (mother), from Kenya, traveled to the United States for their honeymoon.

Azizdin’s father was not formally educated, but very business-oriented. He was a very good mechanic and decided that moving to America would present better opportunities for his wife and future family.

Keval relocated himself and his wife from Africa to Canada, and finally, to the United States, bringing with him only $800. Years passed as Keval worked odd jobs, receiving money under the table to support his family. Keval worked on a farm picking tomatoes, fixed cars, and finally, after receiving his green card, started building his business.

Keval did really well for himself despite not having graduated from high school.  He owned several businesses, ranging from cleaners to a car dealership.  He came to America around the age of 30 and was able to retire at the age of 60 because of the empire he created. He and Ruksana returned to Africa for retirement.

Keeping culture

Azizdin was born in Elizabethtown. Along with her siblings, she was raised embracing the cultures of India and Pakistan. Growing up as a dual-cultured individual, Azizdin witnessed division, being Indian, and not being Pakistani.

She said many Muslims in Central Pennsylvania are Pakistani. Growing up, Azizdin didn’t have the day-to-day exposure to diversity.

“I’ve always been attracted to diversity,” Azizdin said.

The small community of Elizabethtown didn’t allow for exposure to the culture and diversity she longed for. As a child, Azizdin loved the frequent visits back to Kenya. She wasn’t seeing only friends and family, but was also finally exposed to the people who were missing in her daily life back in Elizabethtown.

“People usually gravitate to what they’re used to,” Azizdin said. “With me, it was with what I couldn’t have. I craved it and I still do.”

Azizdin loves her culture.

“My culture is my world, consisting of a blend of everything: African, Pakistani, Indian, and Ethiopian.”

Growing up, Azizdin wasn’t permitted to speak English at home. Her father didn’t want his children to lose the language and culture that comes with being who they were as people. Their language of Kutchi is rare and the one thing Keval wanted to maintain for his family.

Azizdin didn’t understand what her dad was trying to instill in the children. Now, with three children of her own, she understands completely. She teaches her children that they will speak their language because “it’s your language.”

Azizdin believes the challenges she has faced growing up allowed her to love diversity. It gave her the ability to relate to different people while embracing the culture they, as individuals, bring.

“I feel when you have cultural diversity, you tend to be a more open-minded person,” Azizdin said. ­­

Her career dreams always consisted of working in higher education, but her road to a career in that field was full of turns.

Azizdin grew up in a strict home. When she went to college, she derailed and started down a different path. Fortunately, she had people who pushed her back on track. She appreciated the people who assisted her and saw the benefits of wanting to help other people the same way.

Unfortunately, Azizdin said, her father didn’t have the same vision. He envisioned a career in medicine or science for his daughter. Azizdin explained that from her father’s perspective and her culture, success wasn’t reached by being a counselor. It was going into a program like science, engineering or medicine that would bring in the money. That was success.

So began her travels down Academic Lane toward success. She explored being a pharmacist because that’s what her father wanted, but didn’t like it. While figuring out her career path, Azizdin got engaged to her now-husband, Arfaat.

Building another dream

Arfaat left Kenya to attend Harrisburg Area Community College with Rubina.  She later decided to apply to the occupation therapy program at Elizabethtown College and Arfaat applied to the physical therapy assistant program at Central Penn College.  But, during her last two years in the program, Azizdin discovered she didn’t want to be an occupational therapist. Her true calling was working in mental health.

She graduated from Elizabethtown College with a bachelor’s degree in health, and started her master’s degree in counseling and human services. Later, she accepted a family counselor job at WellSpan Philhaven, where she still works after 10 years.

While working with WellSpan Philhaven, Azizdin was able to network with different people and organizations. She was able to meet with families during crisis intervention, and people in homeless shelters, churches, schools and other places where caregivers were needed.

“It was a blessing,” Azizdin said. “It was everything that I loved.”

Azizdin’s career led her to a part-time position at Penn State Harrisburg in career counseling, later to a career services position at Harrisburg Area Community College and then to her current position as a career counselor with Central Penn.

Azizdin wants to prove to women, reflecting on her culture, that they come from the same background, that a woman can be an educated, powerful and respected force in society.

“Just because your husband or your father has a view of you being unequal, that doesn’t mean that you can’t break out,” Azizdin said.

Azizdin witnessed many people being treated in a way she believed was unfair — even her friends. They had their freedom, she said, but at the same time, they didn’t. Some female students of Central Penn, for instance, may not yet understand how to be a powerful woman. Azizdin’s passion for informing other women comes from her experience as a young minority woman.

Getting REAL

This passion of Azizdin’s led her to create the REAL networking group. She decided to make the group women-centered because of conversations among women she heard in the Harrisburg area.

What came out of the conversations was the lack of connections being created. Relationships were superficial. After being approached by many women regarding similar concerns, Azizdin developed the REAL networking group.

The group is a nonbusiness-based one in which everyone is neutral. Members are able to discuss topics, build one another up and support one another, creating the sense of community that goes back to traditional values that are being lost, Azizdin explained.

The group has a Facebook presence of about 300 members and around 20 people attend a monthly Monday meeting, from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., to have lunch, hear guest speakers and participate in empowerment activities.

Azizdin imagines the groups she’s involved with, like REAL, sustaining themselves within the community. Developing a strong local community is the goal, she said.

“I think charity starts at home.”

Azizdin believes groups should start out small, and build. Help the local people first and see where and how the groups develop.

Despite being a group primarily for women, REAL is open to anyone.

“I’ve never said that men aren’t welcome,” Azizdin said. “It’s just that women gravitate more toward the group.”

Good and bad experiences happen to everyone. Azizdin believes the experiences shape people. It’s just a matter of how people apply the experiences, she said.

“I say grow with your experiences. Without experiences, we can’t be who we are.”

Always look forward to a pleasant and bright future, Azizdin said. How does she do it? It’s a two-part process.

“Surround yourself with supportive people,” she advised. “The other part is self-discipline. You just have to prioritize. If you want to get something done, there’s nothing stopping you.”


To comment on this story, or to suggest one, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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Students seek opportunities at job fair

About 20 organizations showed what they have to offer

By Kathleen Tarr and Michael Ademola

Knightly News Reporters

On Nov. 1, representatives of several companies and businesses visited Central Penn for the quarterly job fair to offer interesting insight, information and opportunities for those nearing graduation in search of a job or an internship opportunity.

Among the 20 or so different businesses with table/booths inside Central Penn’s Conference Center were representatives who could appeal to any student’s major.

About 30 students attended, with most present from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Some of the businesses offered opportunities to multiple majors. Some offered different jobs to a single major, and the rest had only one job or internship opportunity for a single major.

Central Penn College Career Services Director Steve Hassinger and Associate Director Rubina Azizdin organized the event to give students the opportunity to bridge the gap between their collegiate and professional careers.

This wasn’t the first job fair the college has offered, and it definitely won’t be the last. If you’re a student who missed out on the opportunity to build relationships with potential employers, make sure you’re at the next job fair!


To comment on this story or to suggest one, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Edited by club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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Fall Job Fair and Student Accommodations Discussed on Latest Podcast

By Paul Miller

Knightly News Co-adviser

On the latest edition of the Knightly News Podcast, we are excited to welcome Career Counselor Rubina Azizdin to discuss the upcoming Fall Job Fair and Title IX Officer Megan Peterson to discuss student accommodations.

During our discussions with Azizdin, we discuss the importance of preparation for a job fair, including having the list of employers ahead of time and coming into the fair with a plan of attack.

We also examine the importance of professional dress and how the free professional clothing that the Career Services Department offers our students came to be and how students can take advantage of this resource.

Also, Azizdin recently won the Shining Star Award as part of the West Shore Chamber of Commerce’s Luminary Awards.   During our conversation, Azizdin believed this was directly related to her efforts with the Women’s Leadership Conference held at Central Penn College in April.

To read more about the Nov. 1 Job Fair – http://www.centralpenn.edu/about-central-penn/news-events-community/fall-job-and-internship-fair/

To learn more about Azizdin’s Shining Star Award – http://blogs.centralpenn.edu/knightlynews/2017/09/14/no-one-outshines-rubina-azizdin-2017-luminary-award-winner/

In the second segment of our podcast, we welcome Title IX Officer Megan Peterson to discuss the process of student accommodations.

During the show, Peterson discusses the services that her office can assist students with, and even went as far as being able to put students in touch with local organizations to further assist students who aren’t sure if they need these accommodations.

Peterson also mentions that accommodations at the college level are student-driven and initiated, a major change for many from public high schools.

While Peterson has now taken maternity leave, she explains that any questions or concerns regarding student accommodations can be handled by the Institutional Effectiveness Director Shawn Humphrey in the Title IX Office in ATEC 305.

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No one outshines Rubina Azizdin, 2017 Luminary Award winner

Honor recognizes Central Penn staffer’s stellar accomplishments

 

Rubina Azizdin, winner of the 2017 Shining Star Award from the West Shore Chamber of Commerce’s Luminary Awards. A photoshoot and headshot, pictured above, from Bevrore, photo studio of Mechanicsburg, was one of the perks of being a Luminary Award nominee. Photo courtesy Rubina Azizdin.

Rubina Azizdin, winner of the 2017 Shining Star Award from the West Shore Chamber of Commerce’s Luminary Awards. A photoshoot and headshot, pictured above, from Bevrore, photo studio of Mechanicsburg, was one of the perks of being a Luminary Award nominee. Photo courtesy Rubina Azizdin.

By Sherri Long

Knightly News Reporter

Rubina Azizdin received the 2017 Shining Star Award on Aug. 30 as part of the West Shore Chamber of Commerce’s Luminary Awards, held in the Radisson Harrisburg, Camp Hill.

The Shining Star Award category recognizes a woman in a nonexecutive role who shows “excellence in their work environment and community,” according to the Chamber’s category description.

Azizdin, Central Penn career counselor and part-time faculty member, found out she was nominated in April, but does not know who nominated her.

“They never read or shared my nomination,” she said.

The Chamber learned a lot about the nominees, though. A survey of 40-50 questions about them, their hobbies, family, accomplishments and fun facts was sent to each nominee. The information was used throughout the Luminary Awards campaign and award luncheon.

Perks and fun facts

A perk the nominees enjoyed during the campaign was a photoshoot with Bevrore, a Mechanicsburg photo studio, and each nominee received a headshot photo to use for whatever reason she wants.

The headshots were also used in Luminary Awards advertisements the Chamber placed in online and printed publications, including Susquehanna Style magazine. Social media posts that featured each nominee’s headshot and a fun fact were also used throughout the campaign.

One of Azizdin’s fun facts, according to a Chamber social media post was, “Would want the following written on her tombstone: ‘Please leave me designer purses and shoes instead of flowers – I need to keep up with the latest fashion trends :)’”

“So, I’m known for my shopping addiction,” Azizdin said with a laugh. “I would die without fashion.”

Voting and networking

The winner was elected by a committee through a blind evaluation. Azizdin thought that was a fair process because, “We are a small community and we all know each other, so people didn’t win just because you knew somebody. … [The winner] was kept a secret the entire time.”

The Luminary Awards were created to celebrate business women in the community and “that’s what I’m all about,” said Azizdin.

Nominees met one another during a networking event held prior to the awards luncheon. Azizdin enjoyed being able to mingle with the other nominees.

“With a thing like this, there are so many people and usually you don’t know who you are up against, or you never get to speak to some of the people that you are a part of this process with,” she added. “It was nice to meet all the women up close and personal.”

After meeting the “phenomenal” nominated women, however, Azizdin wasn’t expecting to win. Still, she invited her entire family to come to the award luncheon.

“I said, ‘Look, this is a huge award, a huge event and I want you guys to be there. And, hey, if I don’t win, I still get to see you and then we get to go out and celebrate anyway.’”

Shocking surprise

Azizdin explained the winner-announcement process.

“They called all the nominees up one by one and introduced everybody,” Azizdin said. “But, I don’t even know what they said about me, because I was so nervous! All I remember is something about ice cream. Then we all sat down, and then, they announced my name as the winner.”

Azizdin said it took a few moments to realize she had won. She said she “froze for a bit” while she wondered whether they had really just called her name.

“I was in shock; I’m still in shock,” said Azizdin. “Somehow, I managed to remember to take my speech up with me. Once I got up there I was all right. I was still trying to catch my breath a little, while I started, but then I was okay.”

The Shining Star Award was the first time Azizdin was nominated for something at this level.

“It was awesome to have family and a lot of close friends there,” she said.

With a beaming smile on her face, Azizdin described the event as a “very energetic, fun — you know, just an amazing, glorious type of environment that day.”

Paying it forward

As the winner, Azizdin chose a nonprofit to receive part of the funds raised by the event. She chose the Junior Achievement organization because “it falls in line with everything I’m doing and trying to help out in the community with.”

Junior Achievement helps high school students prepare for the “real world,” through training in subjects such as financial literacy, work readiness and entrepreneurship, according to the Junior Achievement website.

“It’s kind of a training program to better them for their college careers,” Azizdin said.

Azizdin has been involved with the West Shore Chamber of Commerce since she started working for Central Penn, which was “about five years” ago. She isn’t involved directly with the Chamber, but is involved with several organizations that are a part of the Chamber, such as West Shore Young Professionals and American Business Women’s Association.

Azizdin plans to become more involved with the Chamber, after her experience. She loved the award process experience, as well as how the Chamber gives back to the community.

“I want to pay it forward, so, I might be serving on a committee for them, or something like that, in the future,” Azizdin said.

Central Penn College was well represented in the Luminary Awards. Sandra Box, associate director of the Central Penn College Education Foundation, was also a Shining Star nominee.

Cami Ressler, chair of the Education Foundation’s board of trustees, was a nominee for the Visionary Award, which recognizes a female executive community leader.


Sherri Long is president of the Knightly News Media Club @ Central Penn College.

To comment on this story or to suggest one, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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by | September 14, 2017 · 7:18 pm

Career Services Initiatives Featured on Episode 35

Students can take advantage of many opportunities in the coming weeks

By Paul Miller

Knightly News Co-Adviser

On our newest edition of the Knightly News Podcast, we welcome Career Services Director Steve Hassinger and Career Services Associate Rubina Azizdin to discuss several current and upcoming initiatives in the Career Resource Center on the Summerdale campus.

In our discussions with Hassinger, we looked more closely at the amazing service that the center offers, having a wide array of professional clothing at no cost for our students.

Hassinger discussed the quality of items, saying there were major designers available for the students who have for job interviews or are going to a job fair, have an upcoming class presentation, and even for the students to take a variety of clothing if they are in a current internship.

The podcast also discussed how unique this opportunity is, as Hassinger said he was unfamiliar with any other school that offered this type of resource.

For students to take advantage of this resource, they can go to the Career Resource Center in Bollinger 53 or contact stevehassinger@centralpenn.edu for an appointment.

In our second segment of the podcast, Career Services Associate Rubina Azizdin joined the show to discuss the upcoming Networking Reception, taking place on Aug. 31 from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m. on the ATEC Patio.

During the reception, students will have the opportunity to speak with a wide variety of different individuals:

  • Faculty
  • Staff
  • Local business owners
  • Other important business people from the community

Azizdin discussed the need for students to attend events like this to practice their networking skills, something Azizdin says is essential for student success after graduation.

The event will feature appetizers, beverages, and other special surprises.  Professional dress is mandatory for the event.

For more information on the event or for registration, visit http://www.centralpenn.edu/about-central-penn/news-events-community/fall-networking-reception/


Our last four podcasts can now be found on SoundCloud:  https://soundcloud.com/user-511685837

Episode 35 – https://soundcloud.com/user-511685837/episode-35-steve-hassinger-and-rubina-azizdin

 

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Women’s Leadership Conference Stresses Empowerment and Education

Conference keynote speaker Robyn Hatcher addresses Women's Leadership Conference attendees at the Conference Center at Central Penn. Hatcher encouraged the audience to "let your light shine" and to "embrace your albatross." Photo by Sarayuth Pinthong

Conference keynote speaker Robyn Hatcher addresses Women’s Leadership Conference attendees at the Conference Center at Central Penn. Hatcher encouraged the audience to “let your light shine” and to “embrace your albatross.” Photo by Sarayuth Pinthong.

Over 200 women educated, encouraged and energized one another

By Sherri Long

Knightly News Reporter

Education and empowerment for women were the main purposes of this year’s Women’s Leadership Conference, held last month in the Conference Center at the college.

Rubina Azizdin, career counselor and part-time faculty member at Central Penn, organized the event, which was geared toward women in all stages of their career paths.

The conference featured women leaders in the community and businesses. Attendees ranged from current college students and college leadership, to business employees, leaders and entrepreneurs.

Della Archer, director of employee relations for Harrisburg Area Community College, said she was attending the Women’s Conference because she “looks for ways to network with other women professionals,” and she values hearing “stories of other women to find out how they got to where they are.”

Archer’s coworker, Stephanie Maben, executive assistant to vice president of student affairs at HACC, explained she was attending because “working women face so many challenges. Any opportunity to network with other women is great.”

Albatrosses and rock stars

The conference started off with the breakfast keynote message from speaker and communication expert Robyn Hatcher. Hatcher encouraged attendees to “let your light shine” and to “embrace your albatross.” The albatross, Hatcher explained, is deadweight or a burden. By identifying it, you can reframe it and turn your misfortune into your mission.

Attendees were told to “get your sparkle on,” stood up by their tables, put their hands on their hips, heads held high and shouted, “I AM (after which they inserted three strengths from a list that was at each table)!” This energized the group, and kept the positive and energetic momentum going throughout the conference.

After the uplifting message from Hatcher, attendees went to the breakout sessions of their choice. Sessions were themed with such titles as Knowledge is Power, Financial Literacy, Achieving Your Dreams, Live Your Truth, and Interview Like A Rock Star.

Sharon Kelly, an accounting major student at Central Penn, said, “When I had my first interview, I was really nervous. They gave me this paper to review and asked some questions and I kind of stumbled through it.”

The main reason Kelly attended the conference was for the breakout session How to Interview Like a Rock Star — How to Slay Every Interview for Every Job You Ever Wanted, presented by Amanda King, owner of PeopleSavvyHR Group, to better her chances at her next interview.

 

Tiffany Chang Lawson, executive director of the Governor’s Advisory Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs, encourages attendees to “Live Your Truth” during her breakout session at the Women’s Leadership Conference at Central Penn College. Photo by Sarayuth Pinthong

Tiffany Chang Lawson, executive director of the Governor’s Advisory Commission on Asian Pacific American Affairs, encourages attendees to “Live Your Truth” during her breakout session at the Women’s Leadership Conference at Central Penn College. Photo by Sarayuth Pinthong

Etiquette and power

After the breakout sessions, attendees participated in a five-course luncheon during which Kathy Christopher, general manager for Bridgewood Catering at Central Penn, gave a presentation on proper etiquette for each course of a meal during networking events and luncheon interviews.

During dessert, an energetic fashion show was presented by designer and local business woman Amma Johnson, featuring her AMMA JO fashions, which were modeled by several Central Penn employees, including President Karen Scolforo and Vice President of Academic Affairs/Provost Linda Fedrizzi-Williams. The luncheon ended with the presentation of the Student Leadership Awards.

The conference concluded with a Powerhouse Panel, featuring local women leaders from the government, business and nonprofit sectors. After each panelist made introductory remarks, attendees could ask questions. Questions attendees asked covered discrimination, balancing family and career, and being compassionate, empathetic and successful.

The panel was well-received by attendees.

Azizdin closed the conference by thanking everyone for attending.

From left, Central Penn personnel Adrienne Thoman, Sandra Box, Dr. Linda Fredrizzi-Williams, Megan Peterson, Karen Scolforo and Krista Wolfe ham it up in some clothing they modeled at the conference.

From left, Central Penn personnel Adrienne Thoman, Sandra Box, Dr. Linda Fredrizzi-Williams, Megan Peterson, Dr. Karen Scolforo and Krista Wolfe ham it up in some clothing they modeled at the conference. Photo by Sarayuth Pinthong

Reflecting success

“Everything went really well. Actually, it went better than expected,” Azizdin said about the event during a recap phone interview.

This year’s conference was the second annual Women’s Conference Azizdin organized. Attendance increased from 125 last year to 200 this year. She is “definitely planning on a 2018 conference.”

When asked what she’s learned or any improvements she’ll make for next year, Azizdin spoke about the technology of event planning. She is researching a new registration tool to use because some of the payments did not go through and because of lack of notifications when someone registered. She also advised planners to confirm what technology is in each room a presenter will be using.

“One of the rooms we used had new computer and presentation systems installed over the weekend,” Azizdin said.  “Thankfully, we were able to have someone from IT help with getting the equipment running.”

Azizdin recommends having one or two presenters as back-ups, “just in case.” One of the presenters could not attend due to a family emergency. One of the Power Panel participants, a friend of Azizdin’s, was able to present in that speaker’s place.

Azizdin continues to get positive feedback from attendees and through responses from emailed surveys.

She has several ideas for next year’s conference topics and planning, including looking for more corporate sponsors to help fund the event and for more giveaways at the conference.


Sherri L. Long is president of the Knightly News Media Club @ Central Penn College.

To comment on this story, or to suggest a story, contact the KnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi

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The Knightly News Podcast Welcomes Dean Melissa Wehler and Previews The Business Partner of the Year Breakfast

By Paul Miller

Knightly News Co-Adviser

The Knightly News Podcast has had a constant string of amazing guests and Episode 27 is no different, as we welcome Dr. Melissa Wehler, Dean of the Humanities and Sciences Department, and Rubina Azizdin from Career Services.

During the first segment of the podcast, Azizdin discusses the upcoming 13th Annual Business Partner of the Year Breakfast, taking place June 7 from 8:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m. in The Conference Center at Central Penn College.

Each term, the Career Services Department at Central Penn College puts on a special event in order to help our student network and gain experience in a professional setting.

The Business Partner of the Year Breakfast provides an outlet for students to meet local leaders, participate in discussions with business owners, and allows students to work on their elevator speech, all while offering a delicious breakfast buffet for all to enjoy.

For more information and to register, please check out Centralpenn.Edu’s page.  Act now though, as registration is only open until May 31.

In the second segment of the show, the Knightly News Podcast welcomes Dr. Wehler to discuss new initiatives being taught in our newly revised IDS101:  CPC Foundations class.

During the segment, Wehler discusses the importance of making quality decisions while in college, especially related to first-generation college students, which of which she is as well.

Wehler stresses the importance of having goals and making efforts to seek out professor’s office hours, the learning center, the library, and other school resources.

The Knightly News thanks you for your continued support!

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Podcast Episode 23 Features Women’s Leadership Conference Organizer

The conference comes to Central Penn College on April 24.

By Paul Miller

Knightly News Co-Adviser

The Knightly News is proud to release our newest podcast, featuring two female leaders on the Central Penn College campus.

The first segment of the show features Rubina Azizdin of Career Services to discuss next week’s Women’s Leadership Conference, taking place on the Summerdale campus on April 24.

Basic CMYK

During the show, Azizdin discusses the importance of networking and the need for leadership for our aspiring professionals.

Azizdin is the conference organizer and has received a great deal of support from local organizations like PSECU, and spoke about the process of putting together a conference of this scale.

Registration for this conference ends April 18at 5 p.m. and is free to Central Penn College faculty, staff and students.

To register or for more information on presenters, check out this link.

In addition to Azizdin, Knightly News President Sherri Long stops by the studio to discuss upcoming initiatives of her recently elected presidency.

Long has been working on a Knightly News media kit as well as our first print edition of our quarterly newsletter style publication.

The Knightly News Media Club is proud of Sherri, as she does many wonderful things to support the growth of our organization.

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by | April 17, 2017 · 5:47 pm