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A group of gallant Knights explores Toronto while lending a helping hand

Four-day odyssey is a learning and living

experience of culture and service

 Part two of two.

 Story and photos

By Yuliani Sutedjo

 Knightly News Reporter

 TORONTO – Hi, everyone. Follow me in my story on the four-day journey I took with other students and some staff to Canada in April.

Eight Central Penn students, all from the Summerdale campus except one from the Lancaster center, rendezvoused at the college on a day in early April, at 6 a.m., for the annual alternative term-break trip run by the diversity office, to provide community service— in Toronto. Two Central Penn staff members also went on the trip.

It was windy and chilly, and not fully light.

By 6:15 a.m., we hit the road to Canada.

(Read the first part of the story.)

Day 3

The next day, I woke up around 8:30 a.m., took a shower and went to a supermarket. Around 10 a.m., I went back to the hostel and decided to walk around the Kensington area.

I also wanted to try something jerk chicken. When I to Toronto last year, I didn’t get to try it, because when we arrived to the store, they were about to close and had only a bit left. This year, I walked into the store around 10:50 a.m. They told me they weren’t open yet — not until 11. I took another walk around the complex and came back at 11:10. I went in and debated whether to a get small or a medium order. I decided to get medium.

Man, when I opened the box, the aroma of the chicken and spices was strong, and the food was delicious. It’s the best lunch I ever had in my entire life. It was fried perfectly — was nice and crisp, and also grilled. The chicken was really tasty. I saved a bit for dinner, because I was full when I ate half the portion.

Arlene Throness, a professor at Ryerson University, shows students a plot in the rooftop garden.

Arlene Throness, a professor at Ryerson University, shows students a plot in the rooftop garden.

When lunch was done, the group met at 11:45 to go to Ryerson University to see a rooftop garden. This rooftop garden was created by student studying to become a nutritionist. We also met with a professor named Arlene Throness. Throness was so enthusiastic to show us the garden that she gave us tour and explained the history of the rooftop garden, and what type of plant are in the garden.

We got to try fresh vegetables from the garden, such as spinach, sage, mint, chives and garlic.

The day didn’t end there, though. We went to visit the CN Tower.  The tower opened to the public in 1975. It is named for the Canadian National railroad, which doesn’t own it anymore. It is 1,815 tall, and until 2007 was the world’s tallest free-standing structure, and tallest tower. I visited this last year, so Sovit, Megan and I decided to wait for the other students who wanted to go up to the observation deck. Right after the CN Tower excursion, and after an hour of waiting, we came into a bit of trouble. Romeo decided to buy a poncho. He used the credit card he had, and swiped it at the cash register.

Ooooopps.

The card didn’t work. There is a back story. When Romeo and the others went to Casa Loma, the clerk asked Romeo for his ID, and found that the name didn’t match the name on the card. Romeo explained that it was the school’s card, and he was authorized to use it, but the cashier continued to say he couldn’t, but eventually did it anyway Romeo called the bank and they promised to take care of the problem, and said Romeo would be able to use the card the next day. But before the situation was corrected, the bank clerk would give us only $200 to spend for the day. We were supposed to go to Ward’s Island, in Lake Ontario, but we cancelled — along with the dinner we were supposed to have together.

Well, because the island trip got cancelled, we decided to go to the Art Gallery of Ontario.

We finished seeing the museum around 7:15 p.m. and decided to have dinner in the Kensington area, near the hostel. I decided to eat my leftover jerk chicken. Megan and I decided to buy some sodas, for some caffeine, to prepare for the next day, because we both needed to pay attention to the road.

It was bitter sweet that Wednesday would be our last day in Toronto.

Day 4

We all woke up at 7 a.m. and departed Toronto by 7:15, on toward Niagara Falls.

The weather was rainy and windy.

Urgh.

We arrived at Niagara Falls around 9:20, and it was still raining, and the gift shop wasn’t open yet. We left Niagara Falls around 9:40 a.m. for home.

Around 10:20, we ate at a gas station in New York, and right after that, we hit the road again.

Once again, there were hills, mountains, fields and windmills, and we passed the lake we had seen on the way up a few days before. By 12:47 p.m., we were in Pennsylvania, and by 2:48, we saw the Welcome to Harrisburg sign. We arrived in Summerdale around 3:15 p.m.

Overall, it was a great trip! We got to volunteer at the food bank, and enjoy the diversity of the Kensington neighborhood of Toronto.

Come and join this program next year!


 

For information on the alternative term-break trip, contact Romeo Azondekon.

To comment on a story or to suggest a story idea, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Yuliani Sutedjo is vice president of The Knightly News Media Club @ Central Penn College.

She is also Central Penn College Student Government Association president.

Edited by club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

 

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A group of gallant Knights explores Toronto while lending a helping hand

Four-day odyssey is a learning and living

experience of culture and service

Part one of two.

Story and photos

By Yuliani Sutedjo

Knightly News Reporter

Day 1

TORONTO – Hi, everyone. Follow me in my story on the four-day journey I took with other students and some staff to Canada in April.

Eight Central Penn students, all from the Summerdale campus except one from the Lancaster center, rendezvoused at the college on a day in early April, at 6 a.m., for the annual alternative term-break trip run by the diversity office, to provide community service— in Toronto. Two Central Penn staff members also went on the trip.

It was windy and chilly, and not fully light.

By 6:15 a.m., we hit the road to Canada.

On the way up Interstate 81 through Pennsylvania and into New York state – up, up, up toward Niagara Falls, and Canada – we passed towns and cities, mountains, farms, rivers, lakes and windmills.

We drove on and on, in two cars.

After about 300 miles, we arrived at the Canadian border at about 11:37 a.m.

When we reached the border crossing, the Canadian border guard at the gate asked Megan Cline, Central Penn counselor, some questions such as, where we were from, what we would be doing in Canada, and where we would stay and where we would go while in Canada. The officer’s tone was intense; she seemed like a drill sergeant.

Once through the grilling, and the gate, it took another hour and a half to arrive at the College Backpackers Hostel, in Toronto’s Kensington neighborhood.At 1:30 p.m., we got our room, had a quick nap for an hour, and then came back to meet up around 2:45 to have lunch at the Toronto Eaton Centre mall.

View from hostel window

This is the view from my hostel room window.

Some of us ate Chinese food and others had Indian food, while still others had food from Tim Hortons, a fast-food bistro. After a quick lunch, we explored the mall. The mall has a UNIQLo clothing store, among many others. I looked for some items, and then went to hunt a bubble tea at a place called Chatime. We went back to the hostel around 6.

The day was done. Some of us decided to rest or go to sleep, and some of us decided to watch a movie with Romeo Azondekon, Central Penn’s chief diversity officer. I decided to go to bed around 10 p.m., and skip the movie.

 

Day 2

It was like the day before when we left Pennsylvania – cloudy, windy and raining, but we set out for our destination. The group of us arrived at the North York Harvest Food Bank around 9:50 a.m. We were greeted by Leslie Venturainol and Kadian Clarke. In the food bank, we had the chance to volunteer. Our task was to look for a good can of food, make sure the food was not expired and then to put it in the right storage box. We were proud to volunteer and feed 100 families.

At the North York Harvest Food Bank with Kadian Clarke and Leslie Venturainol.

At the North York Harvest Food Bank with Kadian Clarke and Leslie Venturainol.

The day wasn’t over then, though. We were very hungry and decided to buy lunch at the Eaton Centre, around 1 p.m. Right after lunch, Belinda Rivera, Jasmine Harvey, Danielle Gilbert, Sovit Adhikari, Paul Jones, and Romeo went to the Casa Loma landmark and museum. Megan, and Linda Brown, Johnny McGee, Tiyana Butler and I went back to the hostel. Casa Loma is beautiful. It looks partly like an old castle. My favorite part is the top tower. I was there on another trip.

Around 5 p.m., the group went back to the hostel. An hour late, Romeo, Belinda, Paul and I went to a nearby supermarket to shop for dinner. We came back around 6:45 and started to cook. We had chicken, rice, soup beans, green beans and boiled potatoes.

Sovit Adhikari, Jasmine Harvey, Tiyana Butler, Linda Brown, Paul Jones and Danielle Gilbert make supper at the hostel.

Sovit Adhikari (background, left), Jasmine Harvey, Tiyana Butler, Linda Brown, Paul Jones and Danielle Gilbert make supper at the hostel.

During dinner, we talked about who our favorite actor and our favorite singer is, and discussed what we liked about Central Penn College. Right after dinner, Belinda, Danielle, Johnny, Jasmine, Linda and Tiyana decided to go to the Ripley Aquarium. The aquarium closed at 11 p.m., so they wanted to get going.

When they were finished touring the aquarium, the students were waiting to get picked up around 11 p.m. Meanwhile, I stayed at the hostel to get some rest. All of a sudden, my phone vibrated. It was a text from Central Penn student Mbuyi “Steve-O” Osango, who had already been in Toronto. Steve-O came to visit, and spent two and a half hours at the hostel. During his visit, around 11:15, Tiyana called Steve-O so she could talk to me, because she couldn’t reach me – my phone was out of data.

“Is Romeo on his way?” she asked me.

“I guess so,” I said.

Because I wasn’t sure if Romeo was on his way to pick the group up at the aquarium, and my phone was no use, I went to the guys’ room, where Romeo was staying for the trip, to confirm that he was on his way to pick the students up.

“Yes,” they said.

Another phone call came in around 11:25. Romeo still wasn’t there, and it was cold. That’s when Megan decided to pick the group up.

Some people, including me, didn’t have data, so we were depending on the Wi-Fi.

As Megan went to pick them up, I kept in touch with everyone in the group chat and Steve-O decided to get some food at Subway. Fifteen minutes later, Romeo came in with Steve-O, whom he met outside the hostel, where he had been waiting for the call to pick the group up.

It turned out there were some miscommunication and technology issues. Eventually, though, we all settled down, and things were cleared up.


Editor’s note: Watch for the next installment of this story!


To comment on a story or to suggest a story idea, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Yuliani Sutedjo is vice president of The Knightly News Media Club @ Central Penn College.

She is also Central Penn College Student Government Association president.

Edited by club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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Diversity Committee Continues To Expand Inclusivity, Diversity

More “safe” spaces and ethnic studies are being considered for Central Penn

By Yuliani Sutedjo

Knightly News Reporter

and

Michael Lear-Olimpi

Knightly News Co-adviser

After three and a half years of discussion and research, Central Penn College recently installed a gender-neutral restroom to expand inclusiveness and diversity on campus.

The gender-neutral restroom is one of four among significant campus inclusivity initiatives the committee has been working on recently.

The restroom:

  • Accommodates the personal needs of transgender people.
  • Recognizes the views of people who do not identify with a gender.
  • Provides families of any gender composition a restroom for more than one member to use at the same time.

“It wasn’t just my idea, but also the Diversity Committee, who wanted to improve the school and look to open another safe space for inclusion and diversity,” said Romeo Azondekon, chief diversity officer, of the gender-neutral restroom.

The Diversity Committee consists of Central Penn faculty and staff members, and usually has a student representative.

Initiative 1 – easier equal access

The first initiative was to make doors at Central Penn accessible for people with a condition or illness that prevents them from opening doors without some assistance.

Automatic door-opening buttons were installed in the Advanced Technology Education Center (ATEC) in the second half of last year.

Previously, the doors were operated remotely by someone inside ATEC at the reception desk.

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Yuliani Sutedjo, communications major, and Lester McMillan, an entrepreneurship major, wash their hands in a gender-neutral restroom on Central Penn campus, Feb. 17, 2017. Photo by Sarayuth Pinthong

Initiative 2 – the gender-neutral restroom

Azondekon said the gender-neutral restroom was created not because there was a problem, but because such an accommodation is a part of Central Penn’s commitment to inclusion and diversity.

“We believe in inclusiveness and diversities,” Azondekon said.

Personnel from Central Penn’s Facilities Department converted the men’s restroom on the second floor of ATEC into the gender-neutral restroom, which includes two urinals in stalls for privacy, and two toilets in stalls.

A black-on-gray sign outside the restroom says “Gender Neutral” in English and in Braille, and features silhouettes with clothing shapes that traditionally have represented a woman and a man, and one with half-male and half-female traditional clothing attributes, suggesting transgender individuals.

The room is also accessible to people in wheelchairs and with limited walking ability.

The sign outside of the ATEC Bathroom in the second floor lobby. Photo by Sy Pinthong.

The sign outside of the ATEC Bathroom in the second floor lobby showing the Gender Neutral designation. Photo by Sarayuth Pinthong.

The ATEC facility is in addition to two nongender-designated and handicapped-accessible restrooms in the Charles “T.” Jones Leadership Library. All restrooms in ATEC are handicapped-accessible.

The Health Sciences Building has a designated men’s room, women’s room and nongender-designated restroom, though it is not labeled “gender neutral,” according to Dr. Krista Wolfe, dean of the School of Nursing and Health Sciences.

The difference between gender-neutral and other nongender-designated restrooms is that the former are for people of any gender identification and the latter are generally for anyone to use one person at a time, or for family members to use together, such as when a parent or guardian is with a child who requires adult supervision or assistance.

Azondekon said the Diversity Committee hopes more gender-neutral restrooms will be established on campus.

“(We’re considering) at least one gender neutral restroom in each education building,” he explained.

The campus has a gender-neutral Super Suite, according to Title IX Officer Megan Peterson, who until recently was director of residence life. The unit is one of three themed residences to which students who qualify must apply to live. The others are for Lady Knight basketball players and one for the alumni association, of which current students can be members.

Initiative 3 – ethnic studies

Committee members are working on the third initiative, establishing an ethnic studies program.

“We’d like to have an ethnic studies track at some point,” said Maria James-Thiaw, professor of writing and a member of the Diversity Committee. “It’s something for the future, to better prepare students for the diverse workplaces and world they’ll be entering.”

When such a program would debut at Central Penn is not known.

Initiative 4 – a place to worship

Another project the Diversity Committee is working on is establishing an interfaith/nonfaith-specific prayer room, or other type of space where students can pray, meditate or engage in whatever reflective practice or ritual they choose.

“Some students expressed a desire to have a place where they can contemplate, or formally pray, that is private and quiet,” said Michael Lear-Olimpi, assistant professor of communication and a member of the Diversity Committee. “We have limited space on campus, and members of the committee and Mr. Azondekon have been talking with college officials, staff and faculty about where this space could be.”

Options that have been explored include sharing space with the campus courtroom, providing space in the library, and perhaps cordoning off space in campus housing. Each of these possibilities did not work out, though, because use of the proposed spots was heavier than widely known.

When a prayer space will open for use, or what it will be called or where it will be located, has yet to be determined. Azondekon said the search for a space continues.

“We need one,” he said. “It is important to people who want that.”

Change can take time

The gender-neutral restroom in ATEC was set up relatively quickly, because it involved modest alterations.

Other initiatives, such as establishing the prayer room, can take time because of specific logistics challenges, such as finding an appropriate place on a small campus.

“These initiatives are being discussed properly, and thought out thoroughly,” Azondekon said.


 

To comment on this story or to suggest one, contact KnightlyEditors@Centralpenn.edu.

Edited by Media Club Co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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The Central Penn College #IAM Campaign

Knightly News Secretary spearheads PSA Campaign for Initiative

By Paul Miller and Sarayuth Pinthong

Knightly News Secretary Sarayuth Pinthong offers a fantastic look at the #IAM campaign from The Office of Diversity and Global Education at Central Penn College as part of a project in his COM225:  Writing for Public Relations course.

The #IAM campaign is in support of their “Our Diversity” messaging in the fall term of 2016.

The campaign informed students and staff members about “going beyond the optics” and understanding our similarities and commonalities. Everyone’s responsible for diversity on campus.

For more information contact: Office of Diversity and Global Education at Central Penn College

Romeo Azondekon: 717-728-2437

romeoazondekon@centralpenn.edu

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The Knightly News Bids Norman Geary a Fond Goodbye

Geary gives final news podcast before graduation

By Paul Miller

Knightly News Co-Adviser

Knightly News Correspondent and former Vice President of the Media Club, Norman Geary, joined the Knightly News Podcast for his final news episode.

In the first segment, Geary discusses the recent Central Pennsylvania Employment Consortium (CPEC) job and internship fair, held Feb. 21, at the Radisson Hotel Harrisburg in Camp Hill.

While attending, Geary discussed some of the students he spoke with regarding the event, as well as giving unique insight to how to approach a job fair such as this.

Discussions also included a recap of the Knightly News’ recent open house and a debate about the feasibility of “Tuition Free” college education.

In the second segment, Romeo Azondekon, Chief Diversity Officer at Central Penn College, reviews the Black History Month Luncheon.

According to Azondekon, this luncheon was one of the most well attended events in the history of the college.

In addition, Azondekon highlights the upcoming Alternate Term Break, where Central Penn College students can venture to Toronto over the break between the winter and spring terms.

In Toronto, students will be immersed in the culture of the city, all while doing community service and offering students a unique opportunity without missing any classes.

The podcast is completed with a special note from the Knightly News Media Club to Geary.


Editor’s Note:  Geary has given a series of news podcasts over his last three terms and hopes to employ this experience at a future position after graduation.

Geary was one of the founding members of the Knightly News Media Club.

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Campus Forum: State of the Nation

Central Penn community discusses racial tension in America

 By Norman Geary

Media Club Reporter

Last month, Central Penn College held a campus forum in the Capital BlueCross Theatre to discuss student feelings on race relations in the nation, and recent conflicts between police and citizens, particularly between police and African-Americans.

The forum, State of the Nation, was an open discussion facilitated by Chief Diversity Officer Romeo Azondekon and Dean of Students Dave Baker.

The forum was suggested by a student.

Input from the campus community came from students, faculty, staff and administration on a range of social issues, including the Black Lives Matter movement.

About 50 people attended through the two-hour session, with some coming and going as class and work schedules required. President Scolforo also attended.

“With the whole ‘Black Lives Matter’ theme, it is a very positive and touchy subject,” communications student Keith Nixon said. “We are looking to make a change in the African-American world. As we have seen around the world, innocent black people are getting killed for no reason. (People are) being asked by police officers to follow the rules and do what you’re told, and people are following the rules, and still getting shot and killed in front of their families and on tape, for no reason.”

Some history

“Ever since the George Zimmerman and Trayvon Martin incident, there has been no justice for the black community,” Nixon added. “I do not know why. We did not ask to be here, if you get my drift. (It’s) not just that ‘Black Lives Matter’ – all lives matter. But mainly it’s been the black lives … that have been attacked, punished and killed. For what reasons, we cannot even explain. They are on videotape and yet our lovely justice system has seemed to look the other way. I just do not understand. What more has to take place to be equal? We are all equal; no one is above anyone.”

Gina Bianchini, an entrepreneur and investor who co-founded the social-network-building firm Ning and founded the similar company Mightybell, recently wrote an article on the topic of social movements. She posted the article on LinkedIn. Her remarks fit the mood and comments expressed at the Central Penn forum.

In her article, Bianchini said: “A movement requires members to take action – showing up for hearings, calling officials or writing op-eds. When you combine these actions in a community where people are building relationships with each other in chapters, teams or classes, the power gets obvious.”

“A hashtag does not create a movement — it simply raises awareness to attract followers,” she continued. “Over the long run, follows and shares do little to produce lasting loyalty or sustain change in politics, society or business. In practice, change only happens when followers are organized, such that the most passionate among them can meet each other and coordinate action.”

IT major Darryl Morgan offered perspective.

“Black Lives Matter is a much needed movement in this country today,” Morgan said. “Reading over the foundations of the movement online, there is a good focus and a good basis with the people that created the movement. The thing they need to work on is communication and organization. There are too many outside people that are using the name of the movement and causing more derogatory actions, violent actions and taking away other people’s rights in an effort to bring this subject to light.”

Blacklivesmatter.com lists 38 chapters nationally.

Dean Baker also offered perspective during the forum.

“I thought the event was great,” Baker said afterward. “I thought students showed a lot of courage. And staff shared their point of view, so I thought it was good. I think we should do a follow-up and continue the conversations.”

What needs to be done?

Business administration major Tyree Tucker provided his take on the forum.

“It’s time to stop talking about what we are going to do and (start) talking about ways to resolve the problem,” Tucker said “It’s simply getting up and resolving the problem. It starts from within, it starts from us. We say ‘Black Lives Matter’ – it starts with us, black people. Before you try to love everybody else, we first must love ourselves in order to make a change. If not, it’s useless, so for us to do that, we must first love ourselves, which means after we love ourselves, we can love everybody else.”

Tucker offered an example of how to model meaningful behavior.

“I believe with my actions, I can be a positive impact to my surroundings. So the people that I positively influenced, they can also have a positive influence on their surroundings. We are not going to be at the same place at the same time. So by me ‘showing that love’ on that brotherhood or sisterhood, it’s going to bring everybody together and, eventually, in my surroundings. We have to start from some point. You can’t do everything at once. Start out with something small and eventually the small things lead to bigger things.”

Romeo Azondekon, Central Penn’s chief diversity officer, provided some concluding comments.

“I think the purpose of the forum allows us to move past rhetoric and agendas and move toward solution oriented approaches. I think the theme behind it was ‘unity of the campus environment,’ but also something that can transition into what is happening outside of our campus.

“One of the things that I loved was everyone was not afraid or was open to sharing perspectives and actually hearing each other out. I think with what is going on in our society right now, not enough of us are being heard, or that we are being heard with the ear of resentment and disagreement. There is not a lot of love and embracing.”

Must we all agree?

“To embrace someone does not mean you have to agree with them, but you have to take their plight or their position as valid,” Azondekon said. “And I think that is what people are looking for. Yes, it was a good event, in my eyes.

“I was looking for a little more dialogue, but really feel, in summation, it exemplifies, again, keeping our campus intact, and not being afraid to have the conversation. Because a lot of college and universities would have avoided that kind of forum pretty quickly. But it shows where we are at as a college, which values diversity and inclusion at Central Penn College. We know a lot of these issues circle around that, one way or another.”

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Central Penn College Welcomes Local Artists

Art Association of Harrisburg Winter Soiree held in Capital BlueCross Theatre

By Christine Fusselman

Media Club Reporter

Central Penn hosted the first Winter Soiree of the Art Association of Harrisburg (AAH) in the Capital BlueCross Theatre on Jan. 31.

Visitors entering the black-box theater were drawn in by the striking artwork displayed on metal grid frames and a few tables throughout the room.

Central Penn’s own Danielle Klebes’ larger-than-life oil painted portraits were displayed front and center. Klebes has won Best in Show in the AAH Annual Figure Show two years in a row.

Her paintings included the familiar faces of Summerdale campus students “Kamal” and “Steve-O,” and another artist-in-residence, Dalton James, who is the college’s writing center director and her spouse. (Klebes uses the last name “James” in her personal and non-art professional life.)

“I feel like the painting describes me, because it’s big, like my personality,” quipped Steve “Steve-O” Osango.

According to Carrie Wissler-Thomas, AAH president and sales gallery manager, the association’s soirees, typically held throughout the summer at various homes and businesses, are designed as audience-builders and fundraisers. She added that the Central Penn show was the first AAH meet-the-artist soiree held on a college campus.

“The space surprised me,” said jewelry artist Alonna Marie Columbo. “It is a great space. The exposed dark ceiling … is simple and elegant. It is a beautiful space to display fine art.”

Columbo displayed her handcrafted jewelry, some of which was made with gold sandstone and tiger’s eye.

Sarah Davidson, who works in the Central Penn marketing department, shared her photography, which she said included “examples of nature in all forms of life, from beginning to decay.”

Davidson said the show was a “very nice way to mingle with local artists and other members of the community.”

Dustin Nispel and Jessica Flynn, two owners of The Rooted Artist Collective, in York, shared their talents from the theater’s stage. Both worked on paintings during the show, with previously painted works nearby, but also took some time to present a poetic duetNispel and Flynn performed “Bottom of the Blossom,” a poem that won them first place in an international poetry contest in Macedonia in October. According to Nispel, the trip to Macedonia required some serious fundraising, but was an incredible experience, which included touring a mosque built around 1406.

 Jessica Flynn and Dustin Nispel performing a poetic duet, “Bottom of the Blossom.”

Jessica Flynn and Dustin Nispel performing a poetic duet, “Bottom of the Blossom.”

Nispel’s book of poems, “The Tower,” and Flynn’s poetry book, “Through the Cracks,” are both published by Poem Sugar Press and available on Amazon.com.

Representing the art of music with his combination of electronic and international traditional instruments, including a Chinese Hulusi, poet, painter and musician Jonathan Frazier entertained the audience with a variety of melodies.

Frazier said he has “always played keys and guitar,” but his collection of international instruments began developing more recently with his purchase of a flute from the annual Native American Pow Wow held during Harrisburg’s Kipona Festival.

IMG_20160131_155648923

Painter, illustrator and musician, Jonathan Frazier entertained soiree guests with international instruments such as a Chinese Hulusi shown here.

Frazier, a former Central Penn adjunct instructor, also works as an illustrator when he is not playing music.

AAH member Andrew Guth presented a sampling of his work with block printing at the soiree. Guth’s colorful shapes were displayed on fabric bags and framed prints. His work can be viewed at the Millworks in midtown Harrisburg, where he leases studio space.

Guth felt the “vibe” was different than that at the typical soiree, but said, “The staff and president were very welcoming.”

Romeo Azondekon, Central Penn’s director of cultural diversity, displayed some framed works in mixed media.

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Central Penn College’s Chief Diversity Officer, Romeo Azondekon, shared his artwork which combines bursts of color and texture.

Local photographer Mary Fox also exhibited.

“This may be the start of a wonderful tradition,” according to Matt Lane, director of the Central Penn College Education Foundation.

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