Tag Archives: Michael Lear-Olimpi

Knightly News Celebrates Episode 50 of Podcast

By Brian Christiana

Knightly News Reporter

The Knightly News Media Club at Central Penn College recently celebrated its two-year anniversary with the 50th episode of the club’s podcast.

The first episode of the podcast featured co-host Paul Miller, Career Services Director Steve Hassinger and the late Nasir Harris. The 50th episode featured Dr. Linda Fedrizzi-Williams, interim co-president and provost, as the guest.

Episode 50 will be released Feb 20.

The episode focuses on different accomplishments Fedrizzi-Williams has achieved since taking over the position last fall.

Miller talked to her about many topics, which included: current initiatives, upcoming commencement as co-president and her most proud achievement at the school (listen to our podcast to hear what that is).

Media club member Michael Ademola and this reporter talked about many questions the student body had for her.

Fedrizzi-Williams was very honored and appreciative to be featured on the milestone.

“I was honored to be a part of the 50th podcast episode with Professor Miller, Brian Christiana and Michael Ademola,” Fedrizzi-Williams said. “I look forward to listening to the next 50 episodes.”

Because we are celebrating two years, we would like to look back at important moments in club history, including: The Bill Gladstone Project, Moving to the Boyer House and the Nasir Harris Studio Dedication.

The Bill Gladstone Project was an opportunity for the communication students to help a local real estate man with hands-on work. The students made a video that included his bobblehead.

The Knightly News made a huge splash and moved the podcast studio into the historic Boyer House in February 2017. The moving process was easy, and the club started working a week later. An open house was held at the building and over 30 faculty, staff and students showed up to celebrate this event.

The studio was dedicated in the summer of 2017 to honor the late Nasir Harris. He was one of the founding members of the club, and he really had a huge impact on the creation of the Knightly News. Harris was on the inaugural episode of the podcast and appeared on several other episodes.

In September 2017, the Knightly News decided to give thanks to him by naming the studio after him. The current members had a celebration with his family and members of the Central Penn family. There was a video presentation that included interviews, and quotes from his family. There were tears and smiles for the celebration.

The Knightly News wouldn’t be here also without the constant support from the community and fans. The goal of the club is to reach out and make a positive impact on the college.  The Knightly News wants to thank all the listeners of each podcast, and reader of each story.

A piece of trivia: Do you know who is the most frequent visitor on the podcast?

Please submit your answers to this trivia question by commenting below.


Brian Christiana is president of the Knightly News Media Club.

Edited by media club co-advisers Professors Paul Miller and Michael Lear-Olimpi.

 

 

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A Day in New York City

Students visit United Nations, seek their own adventures

By Brian Christiana and Paul Jones

Knightly News Reporters

On Nov. 3, Central Penn Chief Diversity Officer Romeo Azondekon took several students to New York City for a visit to the United Nations.

The students traveled around the city and had to interview another person of a different culture or ethnicity.

“It was a very cool and an eye-opening experience. I had an opportunity to go into the United Nations, where many people don’t get to go,” said corporate communications major Michael Ademola.

The students were from the Student Multicultural Advisory Board, and Hispanic American Student Association.

 

Jones poses in front of the New York City skyline.  Photo courtesy of Paul Jones.

Jones poses in front of the New York City skyline. Photo courtesy of Paul Jones.

Corporate communications major Morgan Littleford said, “I was happy to learn about all the different things about the United Nations and all the different cultures that are involved.”

The students went to different stores, such as the clothing outlets H&M, Forever 21 and other clothing stores.

The entertainment from street performers really helped brighten the mood. Littleford said that she really enjoyed them, and they made her laugh.

For information about these type of trips, contact Azondekon at romeoazondekon@centralpenn.edu or (717) 728-2437.


Brian Christiana is president of The Knightly News Media Club @ Central Penn College.

To comment on this story or to suggest a story, contact TheKnghtlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olmpi.

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Sexual assault can happen anywhere

Even at Central Penn, but awareness is power.

 By Sarayuth Pinthong

Knightly News Reporter

Sexual assault is very common on our nation’s college campuses.

Unfortunately, Central Penn is not exempt, but reports of sexual assault and sexual misconduct at Central Penn are rare.

Even though such reports are rare at Central Penn, with the help of Megan Peterson, Title IX officer and Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) coordinator, students can receive the knowledge that could prevent sexual assault, and possibly save the life of their friends and themselves.

Well developed policy

“Central Penn has an extensive sexual assault policy,” Peterson said. “In our sexual misconduct policy, we go through definitions of different types of sexual misconduct, what constitutes the action and the process that we would go through if a person would bring forward a complaint of sexual misconduct.”

According to Peterson, depending on the type of complaint and how the individual wants it to be handled, sometimes individuals come forward for only resources and support. Sometimes someone comes forward to report to ask for an investigation and hearing, or an informal resolution.

“We have a process for each, depending on how the complainant is comfortable moving forward,” Peterson said. “Our goal is to never force a complainant to handle their case in a certain way if they’re not comfortable.”

Unfortunately, there is an exception. According to Peterson, if a person were to be involved with a violent assault, Central Penn has an obligation to take action for the safety of the campus community.

About our campus

In 2016, Central Penn College had four reports of sexual misconduct, Peterson said. Compared to the amount of sexual assaults occurring on college campuses nationwide, four is a very low number.

2017 had fewer reports.

“If we are strictly talking about sexual assault/misconduct and not other things falling under the Title IX umbrella (harassment, dating violence, etc.), then there were two reported cases of sexual misconduct in 2017, and none so far in 2018,” Peterson said in an email on Feb. 2.

The college publishes an annual security report made available on the college’s website.  Students can view the reported numbers of different types of crimes or sexual misconduct. Individuals can use the report, along with other resources on campus, to be vigilant during their everyday life and better recognize the warning signs of sexual misconduct.

The 2016 report lists two reported violations, under the heading of “Sex Offenses, Forcible (Rape, Sodomy, Sexual Assault w/object and Fondling).” The other two misconduct reports may have been incidents that did not have to be included in the report. Disclosure of reported campus crimes investigated must be reported to the campus community and the public, according to the state’s Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act.

“One in four women are likely to be a victim of sexual misconduct while they’re a student,” Peterson said. “Seventeen percent of men are also likely to be a victim of sexual assault,” she said.

Being aware of sexual assault and the possibility that it could happen can benefit the Central Penn community.

“Alcohol is the number one drug of choice during sexual assault,” Peterson said.

On Jan. 24, the Central Penn College Diversity Committee and the Title IX Office held a discussion forum in the Capital BlueCross Theatre called “Food for Thought: An open, facilitated conversation about sexual harassment,” with two outside experts on the topic – one from the Carlisle YWCA and one from the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape . Chief Diversity Officer Romeo Azondekon and Peterson also participated, with Peterson moderating. Dave Baker, Central Penn’s retention officer and athletics director, took Azondekon’s seat when Azondekon had to depart the panel discussion for a previous engagement.

A universal responsibility

The responsibility of sexual-assault prevention falls on everyone, experts say.

“If you don’t know that sexual assault is a risk, then you don’t know to be mindful and protective of yourself and your friends,” Peterson said. “From an awareness standpoint, we want to bring that issue to light. The more people that talk about sexual assault, the more people feel comfortable to address it.”

According to research, there are only two reasons sexual assault doesn’t happen. One, the person decided not to not move forward with the assault, or two, a bystander decided to intervene.

“If we’re not raising awareness and not having these conversations telling people what red flags to look for,” Peterson said, “the likelihood of knowing what to do and how to intervene is drastically lower than having an informed population.”

Peterson said changes to campus sexual-assault investigation standards from a preponderance of evidence to reasonable doubt that U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos has discussed implementing since her confirmation last year haven’t been put in place yet, and it isn’t known when they might be.

For more information, contact Peterson at (717)-728-2398 or meganpeterson@centralpenn.edu.


This episode of the podcast is also available at our SoundCloud page during the month of February at:  https://soundcloud.com/user-511685837/episode-49-megan-cline-and-megan-peterson

To comment on this story or to suggest a story, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Professor Michael Lear-Olimpi, who provided some update reporting.

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Themed housing event brings students together

By Brian Christiana and Dylan Kleintop

Knightly News Reporters

The residents of townhouse 135 held an event on Jan. 30 in the cafeteria lounge to study for midterms.

The theme of 135 is UBalance, which deals with managing time between school, work and other activities.

The event was for all students and the highlight of the night was the free Buffalo chicken dip.

“The whole point of this was to help bring the student body together, and to prepare for the exams along with scheduling their classes,” Sophia Charles, student residence assistant, said.

Charles is majoring in entrepreneurship and small business.

Fifty to 60 students showed up. Several people noted that it was good for the students to come study for different types of classes.

The students involved were Sophia Charles, Ashanti Conover, Nikolas Hollomon, Kyrin (KEYE-rin) Lloyd and the authors.

Charles, who decided to do a study hall, really did well with helping students with scheduling and homework.

A 2.0 GPA is required for students to live in a themed house. The students must participate in one event related to the theme of the house, and have an article presented in Student Central.

“I feel like this event had a very good vibe to it. It really helped bring students together and they all enjoyed some good food,” said Lloyd, a business administration major.

Ian Kemmerer, a corporate communication major, really enjoyed the food.

“I was really blown away by how much the themed house members put into this activity,” he said. “I hope there is another event like this.”

Another themed house, UCare, townhouse 147, focuses on community issues, and will hold a clothing drive soon during which members will set up boxes for clothing donations.

For more information on themed housing, contact Dillon Epler, associate director of residence life, at dillonepler@centralpenn.edu.


Brian Christiana is president of the Knightly News, and Dylan Kleintop is secretary.

To comment on this story, or to suggest one, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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State journalism organization appoints Lear-Olimpi

By The Knightly News

Michael Lear-Olimpi, assistant professor of communication, has been appointed ethics and diversity chair of the Keystone Pro Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ).

Michael Lear-Olimpi. Photo by Roman Lear-Olimpi

Michael Lear-Olimpi.
Photo by Roman Lear-Olimpi

SPJ is the nation’s largest and oldest journalism professional-development and freedom-of-the-press advocacy group. Ethics and diversity are among the group’s focuses, and are among Lear-Olimpi’s areas of media interest and expertise.

The Keystone Pro Chapter covers all of Pennsylvania, except for the western third of the state.

Lear-Olimpi has been a member of SPJ since the mid-1980s. He served as president of the Greater Philadelphia Chapter from 1998-2001, and as a member of the board of directors from 1995 until 2007.

He will also be helping reorganize the Philadelphia chapter, which disbanded recently. Philadelphia is the nation’s largest city and largest media market currently without an SPJ chapter.

Through his years in SPJ, Lear-Olimpi has been involved in journalism ethics and diversity matters. He has also been involved in similar roles with the American Society of Business Publication Editors, the editorial ethics code for which he has helped revise.

In his position with the Keystone Pro Chapter, Lear-Olimpi will be responsible for designing and implementing ethics and diversity efforts, such as training workshops, and education and outreach initiatives, along with offering members ethics and diversity advice.

SPJ offers professional and student journalists support in a variety of areas. Students can join SPJ, which has chapters on campuses of universities and colleges across the nation that offer journalism and communication degrees.


Michael Lear-Olimpi is c0-adviser of the Knightly News Media Club at Central Penn College, and the editor of our online content and quarterly publication.

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Local journalist to give COM class the scoop on the field

By Michael Lear-Olimpi

Knightly News Co-Adviser

Christen Smith, a staff writer for Guns.com, will speak to Prof. Lear-Olimpi’s COM220 (Journalism I) class on Jan.24, from 11 a.m. to noon, in ATEC 308.

Smith will join our COM220 class on Jan. 24.

Smith will join our COM220 class on Jan. 24.

She will address, and answer questions about, what she does as a daily reporter for a niche-market website and news service, and about working for a daily general-audience news operation.

Smith will also talk about story generation, source development and story craft, and about the skills she uses on the job.

Prior to working for Guns.com, Smith was a reporter for Capitolwire, in Harrisburg, reporting each day, as she explains it, “from the front lines of the Pennsylvania government.” She covered legislation related to education, consumer protection, tax reform and healthcare, and other issues affecting residents of the commonwealth.

Smith went to Capitolwire from The Sentinel (Carlisle) and its website, cumberlink.com, where she reported on county government, other politics, health, business and economic development.

Smith holds a bachelor’s degree in communication and media studies from The Pennsylvania State University, where she was an opinion writer for The Capital Times student newspaper.

All are welcome to attend.

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by | January 23, 2018 · 7:10 pm

Overcoming adversity and leaving a legacy

Meet Curtis Voelker — Mr. Central Penn, and the ‘Next Big Thing’

By Sherri Long

Knightly News Reporter

A picturesque autumn scene of colorful trees, a cloud-dappled blue sky and the historic Henszy’s Bridge is framed by the lobby windows on the second floor of Central Penn College’s Advanced Technology Education Center.

This iconic backdrop was the perfect setting for interviewing Curtis Voelker, admissions counselor at Central Penn College, who is often referred to as “Mr. Central Penn.”   

Curtis Voelker, Mr. Central Penn, with his Standing Ovation Award, for "The Next Big Thing." Photo by Sarayuth Pinthong.

Curtis Voelker, Mr. Central Penn, with his Standing Ovation Award, for “The Next Big Thing.”      Photo by Sarayuth Pinthong.

The persona of Mr. Central Penn evolved from a creation of Voelker’s in 2010 that tied into a new marketing campaign for the college.

“Mr. Central Penn was originally Will Power, who hailed from the planet of Potential in the solar system of Success,” Voelker, 26, said.

Voelker is the presenter for the admissions team at Central Penn and is always thinking of creative ways to connect with potential students. He began is speaking career when he was a freshman in high school. At the request of the foster program he was in, he gave a presentation sharing his personal story of overcoming the adversity of his parents’ arrest, when he was 14.

We are family

Voelker was featured as part of a portrait series created by Uproot Creative Services that showcased the stories of people helping in their communities. Voelker’s personal story video is on Uproot’s site. Voelker continues to share his story during his presentations to connect with and encourage others.

Though his focus during high school visits is on recruiting students to attend Central Penn, it goes well beyond being a job for Voelker. He wants potential students to understand the sense of family that he has experienced at Central Penn since 2009.

“Central Penn brought that sense of family to me, brought that sense of belonging,” Voelker said. “No one else in my family went to college. I didn’t think college was an opportunity for me, and then I met Todd Milano (president in 2009), who kind of recruited me, brought me under his wing. So, I got these great mentors, these great father figures, great mother figures here on campus. They’ve done so much for me here and I just want to try to continue to do as much as I can for Central Penn.”

Encouraging students

In 2012, Voelker earned his bachelor’s degree for business and marketing and was immediately hired by Central Penn. He enjoys being able to use his degree every day through recruiting and presenting, and is proud of the fact that Central Penn takes a unique approach to presenting to high school students.

“We’re one of the only colleges that do in-class presentations. Most admissions teams do what they call guidance visits,” said Voelker.

Guidance visits are appointments scheduled with a guidance counselor and students. The students sign up to participate during that time. According to Voelker, these scheduled visits may have one, three or five students who participate.

Voelker’s approach is to contact a high school teacher to schedule a classroom presentation. The teacher selects a theme of either finding the right college, managing conflict, understanding diversity, or how to make a good first impression. Voelker prefers to present to English classes because they usually contain students in the same grade level.

He also presents to school clubs and organizations, Future Business Leaders of America being one of them. Voelker serves as the alumnus representative for the Pennsylvania Future Business Leaders of America board of directors. He has been involved with the FBLA since his high school days.

“Serving FBLA is kind of my passions all rolled into one through serving the club I was in during high school, then through serving Central Penn, and then serving the students by being a part of the board.”

Dancing with the Stars

Voelker started serving on the board of the East Pennsboro Education Foundation in March. One of his main functions is emceeing Dancing with the East Pennsboro Stars, which is an annual major fundraising event. The main purpose of the foundation is to raise funds for educational purposes for East Pennsboro School District.

“One of the biggest things we’ve done is help fund the new media club at East Penn. It includes things like video cameras, sound equipment, helping students express themselves in different ways, in various projects and papers, and things like that,” Voelker said.

Although not an official representative of the college on the Pennsylvania FBLA or East Pennsboro Education Foundation boards, Voelker said he “doesn’t know if there’s ever a time that I can’t find a way to connect it to Central Penn because that’s my goal; that’s my mindset.”

Central Penn Education Foundation

Voelker serves on the Central Penn Education Foundation as a trustee, a role he began while a current student. He was the first and only current student who was elected to the Education Foundation Board of Trustees and has served since December 2011. As a trustee, he helps select scholarship recipients and raise funds for those scholarships.

One way to encourage the newest alumni to give back to the foundation is through the purchase of a True Cord. These cords are worn by the students at graduation and have their graduation year as the purchase price. This year’s cost was $20.17.

“It’s a simple way to have them start to think ‘Hey, this is a way I can give back.’ It gives them a good feeling when they walk across the stage. Hopefully, that grows.”

Another role for Voelker, as a trustee, is helping with student engagement.

“With myself being a former student, and staff member, and alumni, I really try to help in terms of engaging student involvement,” he explained. “I’ve done a couple of fundraisers with students to help increase the thought of philanthropy and what it means to give back to the alma mater.”

Voelker encourages current students to get involved with events on campus and the community, taking leadership roles, and to work toward leaving a legacy. Voelker and Dillon Epler, associate residence life director at Central Penn, created and led the first Central Penn men’s leadership retreat.

Men’s leadership retreat

The theme for the retreat, held in August, was “A Legacy for Leadership.” The seven participating students identified personal and professional goals, then identified things they are involved in on campus or in the community.

After identifying these, they examined whether their activities were helping them achieve their goals. They discussed what they hoped to leave behind on campus with Central Penn, what legacy they wanted build for themselves, and the importance of leaving a legacy.

The college has had women’s retreats for the last three years, but this was the first men’s retreat. Voelker and Epler, who were housemates during their college days, were pleased with the response.

“This is one of the biggest things we’ve talked about, about wanting to just give back in this way, with leadership and mentorship,” said Voelker. “The group of guys were fantastic. They all took something away from it. They absolutely enjoyed it.”

Voelker, who believes in leading by example, was able to achieve one of his personal and professional goals in October.

TEDxHarrisburg

On Sunday, Oct. 15, Voelker achieved his goal of giving a TED Talk at TEDxHarrisburg. The sold-out event featured 12 speakers and 100 people in the audience.

The process to be one of the 12 speakers began in May with 60 applicants. According to Voelker, the theme for this event was “Evolve.” The TEDxHarrisburg committee reviewed the applications and proposals, and chose around 25 people for the second round. The second round required a one- to two-minute speaking sample.

“From there they chose the top 12, and those were the top 12 who spoke at the actual event,” Voelker said. “My sample presentation was basically two minutes of my personal story and how I could motivate others.”

Voelker’s TEDxHarrisburg presentation was entitled “Evolve through Adversity.” He involved the audience by having them simulate “the storm of success” through tapping feet and snapping fingers. He has received many requests and questions about being able to watch his presentation online. TED released the videos of TEDxHarrisburg 2017 on Nov. 22. Now, those who could not attend the live event may view Voelker’s presentation on The TEDxHarrisburg Team’s YouTube channel.

Curtis, TEDx Harrisburg

Voelker, TED Talk presenter. Photos by Sherri Long.

Voelker, TED Talk presenter. Photos by Sherri Long.

Standing Ovation

2017 has been a year full of service, goal achievement and recognition for Voelker. On Oct. 20, Voelker was awarded the Central Penn Alumni Standing Ovation Award in “The Next Big Thing” category. Voelker was one of four alumni nominees in that category.   

Voelker as superhero in a panel presented at the Standing Ovation Awards in October. Photo courtesy Central Penn College.

Voelker as superhero in a panel presented at the Standing Ovation Awards in October.                        Photo courtesy Central Penn College.

The “Next Big Thing” award recognized “a graduate who stands out among peers for outstanding leadership and service prior to one’s tenth reunion year. Community service, professional accomplishments, and other significant achievements are considered,” according to the nomination flyer from the Central Penn Alumni Association.

Voelker paused, as he thought about what receiving the award meant to him.

“That meant a lot. It meant a lot because there were great nominees, across the board, for all of the different awards. I’m glad we did that because I don’t know if a lot of people realize the standout students that we have. Specifically, for myself, I appreciated the praise for the individual stuff that I did, but it’s really a team effort. It took all 25 nominees to get to where we (alumni) are today.”

Continued education

When asked about earning his master’s degree in organizational leadership, Voelker shook his head, laughed and said, “Crazy.” He explained his response.

“Just thinking back. Littlestown. My graduating high school class was 87 students. We had one traffic light in the entire town. No one else in my family went to college, and I remember thinking, when I started Central Penn going for my bachelor’s, ‘Could I do it? What will the classes be like? What is this experience going to be like?’ I went through it, had an amazing experience, and then thought ‘Okay. Let’s keep it going.’ And then I got my master’s, and was just, like, wow!”

He is considering going for his doctorate.

“My grandma is asking me about it all the time. She wants a doctor in the family. I’m still looking for the free time I thought I’d have after I was done with my master’s, though,” Voelker said, laughing.

PEZ dispensers

Voelker does have some free time, but not much during the busy fall season of visiting and presenting at high schools.

“Any free time that I do have I spend working out or hunting PEZ dispensers,” he said.

Voelker started collecting PEZ dispensers, again, in 2016. His original PEZ collection was started when his father gave him a couple PEZ dispensers, when Voelker was little.

“I had a huge collection up until age 12. I had a whole closetful of seven boxes, two full notebooks of inventory. I had some from Europe, from overseas, whole different kinds of PEZ dispensers. With my personal story, they eventually went away, so, I had to restart from scratch.”

The future

What’s next for Voelker?

“I think right now, I just want to continue doing what I do now, pretty well. I want to increase, obviously, alumni council’s reach and position. Definitely want to increase the foundation. So, maybe no new projects, yet,” Voelker said.

But, Voelker said he is always open to opportunity and looking for ways to give back, which is something that is at his core. Specifically, finding ways to benefit Central Penn and its students and alumni, because he views Central Penn as his home and family.

“When we all continue to help each other learn and grow, we’re continually helping each generation of Central Penn students get that much better of an experience.”


Sherri Long is president of the Knightly News Media Club @ Central Penn College.

To comment on this article, or to suggest one, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.
Edited by Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi, club co-adviser.

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A place to pray

Interfaith prayer room to open soon

By Yuli Sutedjo

Knightly News Reporter

After almost a year and a half, the Interfaith Prayer Room has found a home — in the Boyer House.

The room will be used by students, faculty and staff to pray, and to hold religious or spiritual programs.

There will be different programs that will allow faculty, staff and students to learn about different religions, Chief Diversity Officer Romeo Azondekon said.

Making it comfortable                                                                                                             

Facilities put furniture in a room on the first floor of the historic building, on the northeast corner of campus along Valley Road, around the end of October.

The search has taken a while because space is limited on campus.

Members of the Student Multicultural Advisory Board (SMAB) will be coming in to arrange the furniture and to shelve books by the end of fall term.

Furniture includes a table for a student worker to use while on duty, possibly a beanbag chair, a sofa that the board and the Diversity Committee expect to be donated, and some other pieces from offices and other locations on campus.

The books, which were donated, include such works as the Bible and the Quran.

Schedule, and getting in

Once everything is set up, the interfaith room will be open three days a week and staffed by financial aid counselor John Steindel.

Steindel will supervise use of the room, and when and what day the prayer room will be available, said Azondekon.

To use the room outside of the yet-to-be-established office hours, faculty, staff and students need to schedule an appointment with Steindel. After that, Steindel will have the option to schedule the event and let security know about it, so that the room will be open when the group needs to use the room.

Azondekon said the room should be ready for use by the winter term, which begins in the second week of January.


Yuli Sutedjo is vice president of the Knightly News Media Club @ Central Penn College.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

To comment on this story, or to suggest one, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.

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Knight Owl always-open computer lab for students nests in Bollinger

By Brian Christiana, Amor Duran, Nasi Hayes, Katina Hocker, Laura Lee, Megan Smith, Quinyece Walker and Joel Zola

Students of COM 140, Summer 2017

Special to The Knightly News

In August, Central Penn College opened in Bollinger Hall what sources contacted for this story believe is the school’s first  24-hour, seven-day-a-week computer lab for students.

Students seem to like the additional resource, which includes 21 computers and a printer.

“It is great for the students that live in the apartments and Super Suites,” Student Government Association President Yuliani Sutedjo, a corporate communication major, said.

Valeri Hartman, IT help desk administrator, said the need for a new computer lab has been growing since the merger of the learning and writing centers at the start of summer term. The merger left students with only the library and Advanced Technology Education Center (ATEC) computer lab, in 300, neither of which is open past 10 p.m.

Because Room 41 was across from the Security Department, IT and other personnel saw a perfect opportunity to make the lab 24-7 access.

The lab is open on holidays, even though the college may be closed, Hartman said. Some resident students remain on campus on holidays.

“One of the challenges professors face is not having enough computers for students both in and out of the classroom,” Hartman said. “We’re trying to find a solution for that.”

Prof. Micaiah Smith-Morris said the Knight Owl Computer Lab is good, because a limit on students’ “time is no longer an issue.”

It is, “Clearly communicating an emphasis on academic achievement,” Smith-Morris said.

Bollinger 41 was selected as the location for the room because of its proximity to the security office. Hartman explained that with the lab being open all night, having the office across the hall will put students at ease no matter the time.

The location also provides convenience for on-campus students who will no longer have to walk cross campus to access a computer.

 

Working on extended support time

IT support is not available at the Knight Owl Computer Lab after 3 p.m. Help is available from the Central Penn IT helpdesk from 8 a.m. to 3.

Hartman understands that’s a problem that needs to be dealt with.

“We are working on it,” Hartman said.

Hartman gave some examples of what IT can do to fix the problem.

“Maybe some of the staff can stay later in the evening, till 8-9,” Hartman said. “It’s just a thought.”

She added there is no deadline for providing on-site IT support after 3 p.m., or whether doing so will be possible.

 

Equipment nuts and bolts

“The computers, monitors, keyboards and mice in the Knight Owl lab are all brand new and include three-year warranties on the hardware,” IT Director Tom Parker said.

IT workers had to re-cable all of Bollinger 41, which had been a classroom without student computers, so the computers could match up with outlets.

“A new network switch was added, and a wireless access point was also added to increase the density of available connections in the room,” Parker wrote in an email.

“The total cost per computer is $695,” according to Parker. “That includes the PC with three-year warranty, monitor, keyboard, mouse and the needed video adapter to connect the monitors.”

The total for computers and their accessories came to $14,595. Parker said the re-cabling, network switch, wireless access point and other accoutrements cost about $6,000. He said the approximately $21,000 spent on the lab came from the IT budget and did not require extra funds. Central Penn recently made fiscal cuts across the college to set a budget for the upcoming fiscal year.

The school tries to buy the same computers that are used in other rooms, but it’s not always possible because hardware changes every year. The computers in the Knight Owl lab are Dell computers and are similar to the 100 computers replaced in 2016 in ATEC, Parker said.

No work should be saved to the computer desktops because the computers delete information stored there overnight, as in the rest of the labs.

A security camera was installed in the room as well. If there are any technical issues overnight or on holidays, then students can submit a helpdesk ticket by emailing to helpdesk@centralpenn.edu  or by calling (866) 291-HELP (4357), and leaving a voicemail explaining what the issue is. Students can expect to receive an email answer during the following day.

Hartman suggested using the OneDrive account through Office 365, and to always log out when finished.


To comment on this story, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi, who directed this editorial project, and contributed a small amount of information to the reporting.

 

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Filed under Central Penn College in the Community, On Campus Happenings

Media Club Commissioned To Produce Promotional Videos

By Norman Geary

Media Club Reporter

The Knightly News Media Club at Central Penn College will be doing a video project during the summer term on the Summerdale Campus to promote a local real estate group and to give communications students an opportunity to have hands-on marketing experience.

The real estate group is donating money for the project to cover operations, prizes for videos the students produce and for the club’s treasury.

The Bill Gladstone Group, of Wormleysburg, a commercial-industrial realty office, contacted Central Penn Education Foundation Director Matt Lane and asked whether some Central Penn students would be interested in getting involved with a marketing project that involved a bobblehead figurine of Gladstone that will be used in the company’s marketing projects on social media and other channels.

The idea is for the students to make videos featuring the bobblehead in various locations, such as by industrial and commercial properties. The Education Foundation will match Gladstone’s grant, with foundation money earmarked for student needs.

Gladstone said he wanted to give students an opportunity to get some hands-on marketing experience they will use in the field of communications.

Cutline: A media club video project that the Bill Gladstone Group will use in promotions will feature this Bobblehead figure of Gladstone. Photo by Michael Lear-Olimpi.

A media club video project that the Bill Gladstone Group will use in promotions will feature this Bobblehead figure of Gladstone. Photo by Michael Lear-Olimpi.

How did the project get to the desks of club advisers Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi and Prof. Paul Miller?

“Bill Gladstone approached the Education Foundation about a way for his bobblehead, which is a brand for his business, NAICIR The Bill Gladstone Group, to be featured in some promotional material,” Miller said.  “He asked the media club to have a video project club competition.  The Gladstone Group would provide scholarships or money to the winning teams, and also make a contribution to the media club.”

Three teams were set up: Christine Hoon, media club president, and Yuliani Sutedjo, media club secretary, will be one team; Lawrence Wilson and Nasir Harris, who are active in the club’s podcasts, are another team; and Norman Geary, vice president, and Keith Gudz, advertising and promotions,  are the other team. Club member Sherri Long, graphics specialist, will assist the teams with final editing. The club advisers will guide the teams.

The faculty support center will play a role in helping the club teams polish their videos. The marketing department is also helping by lending the club some equipment.

“We appreciate both contributions from marketing and the faculty support center,” Miller said.  “They have been invaluable to the Media Club’s work and will certainly be an asset with this project.

The project deadline is Week 8 of the summer term, and will be presented to the Gladstone Group in Week 10.

“The media club welcomes Mr. Gladstone’s offer and support,” club co-adviser Michael Lear-Olimpi said. “The contribution to our treasury the Gladstone Group is making for prizes for the videos and for general funding will go a long way in building our inventory to provide learning opportunities for club members. Bill came up with a great idea. Good marketing! And we thank the Education Foundation.”

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Filed under Central Penn College in the Community