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No one outshines Rubina Azizdin, 2017 Luminary Award winner

Honor recognizes Central Penn staffer’s stellar accomplishments

 

Rubina Azizdin, winner of the 2017 Shining Star Award from the West Shore Chamber of Commerce’s Luminary Awards. A photoshoot and headshot, pictured above, from Bevrore, photo studio of Mechanicsburg, was one of the perks of being a Luminary Award nominee. Photo courtesy Rubina Azizdin.

Rubina Azizdin, winner of the 2017 Shining Star Award from the West Shore Chamber of Commerce’s Luminary Awards. A photoshoot and headshot, pictured above, from Bevrore, photo studio of Mechanicsburg, was one of the perks of being a Luminary Award nominee. Photo courtesy Rubina Azizdin.

By Sherri Long

Knightly News Reporter

Rubina Azizdin received the 2017 Shining Star Award on Aug. 30 as part of the West Shore Chamber of Commerce’s Luminary Awards, held in the Radisson Harrisburg, Camp Hill.

The Shining Star Award category recognizes a woman in a nonexecutive role who shows “excellence in their work environment and community,” according to the Chamber’s category description.

Azizdin, Central Penn career counselor and part-time faculty member, found out she was nominated in April, but does not know who nominated her.

“They never read or shared my nomination,” she said.

The Chamber learned a lot about the nominees, though. A survey of 40-50 questions about them, their hobbies, family, accomplishments and fun facts was sent to each nominee. The information was used throughout the Luminary Awards campaign and award luncheon.

Perks and fun facts

A perk the nominees enjoyed during the campaign was a photoshoot with Bevrore, a Mechanicsburg photo studio, and each nominee received a headshot photo to use for whatever reason she wants.

The headshots were also used in Luminary Awards advertisements the Chamber placed in online and printed publications, including Susquehanna Style magazine. Social media posts that featured each nominee’s headshot and a fun fact were also used throughout the campaign.

One of Azizdin’s fun facts, according to a Chamber social media post was, “Would want the following written on her tombstone: ‘Please leave me designer purses and shoes instead of flowers – I need to keep up with the latest fashion trends :)’”

“So, I’m known for my shopping addiction,” Azizdin said with a laugh. “I would die without fashion.”

Voting and networking

The winner was elected by a committee through a blind evaluation. Azizdin thought that was a fair process because, “We are a small community and we all know each other, so people didn’t win just because you knew somebody. … [The winner] was kept a secret the entire time.”

The Luminary Awards were created to celebrate business women in the community and “that’s what I’m all about,” said Azizdin.

Nominees met one another during a networking event held prior to the awards luncheon. Azizdin enjoyed being able to mingle with the other nominees.

“With a thing like this, there are so many people and usually you don’t know who you are up against, or you never get to speak to some of the people that you are a part of this process with,” she added. “It was nice to meet all the women up close and personal.”

After meeting the “phenomenal” nominated women, however, Azizdin wasn’t expecting to win. Still, she invited her entire family to come to the award luncheon.

“I said, ‘Look, this is a huge award, a huge event and I want you guys to be there. And, hey, if I don’t win, I still get to see you and then we get to go out and celebrate anyway.’”

Shocking surprise

Azizdin explained the winner-announcement process.

“They called all the nominees up one by one and introduced everybody,” Azizdin said. “But, I don’t even know what they said about me, because I was so nervous! All I remember is something about ice cream. Then we all sat down, and then, they announced my name as the winner.”

Azizdin said it took a few moments to realize she had won. She said she “froze for a bit” while she wondered whether they had really just called her name.

“I was in shock; I’m still in shock,” said Azizdin. “Somehow, I managed to remember to take my speech up with me. Once I got up there I was all right. I was still trying to catch my breath a little, while I started, but then I was okay.”

The Shining Star Award was the first time Azizdin was nominated for something at this level.

“It was awesome to have family and a lot of close friends there,” she said.

With a beaming smile on her face, Azizdin described the event as a “very energetic, fun — you know, just an amazing, glorious type of environment that day.”

Paying it forward

As the winner, Azizdin chose a nonprofit to receive part of the funds raised by the event. She chose the Junior Achievement organization because “it falls in line with everything I’m doing and trying to help out in the community with.”

Junior Achievement helps high school students prepare for the “real world,” through training in subjects such as financial literacy, work readiness and entrepreneurship, according to the Junior Achievement website.

“It’s kind of a training program to better them for their college careers,” Azizdin said.

Azizdin has been involved with the West Shore Chamber of Commerce since she started working for Central Penn, which was “about five years” ago. She isn’t involved directly with the Chamber, but is involved with several organizations that are a part of the Chamber, such as West Shore Young Professionals and American Business Women’s Association.

Azizdin plans to become more involved with the Chamber, after her experience. She loved the award process experience, as well as how the Chamber gives back to the community.

“I want to pay it forward, so, I might be serving on a committee for them, or something like that, in the future,” Azizdin said.

Central Penn College was well represented in the Luminary Awards. Sandra Box, associate director of the Central Penn College Education Foundation, was also a Shining Star nominee.

Cami Ressler, chair of the Education Foundation’s board of trustees, was a nominee for the Visionary Award, which recognizes a female executive community leader.


Sherri Long is president of the Knightly News Media Club @ Central Penn College.

To comment on this story or to suggest one, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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by | September 14, 2017 · 7:18 pm

Common Hour focuses on Knight & Day Café meal plan, food choices

By Darren Greene

Knightly News Reporter

Central Penn College had a weekly common hour town hall meeting in August with representatives of The Knight & Day Café, and results of the meeting left students with mixed emotions.

This town hall meeting was a way for students to voice their concerns about the cafe. Kathy Christopher, general manager of the cafe, was there to answer questions.

She addressed nine students at a table in the cafe.

Christopher started the conversation by talking about the meal plan at Central Penn College. She explained that a basic meal plan of $690 is not enough for most of Central Penn students. She said her research of “hundreds” of college meal plans found the lowest was $3,600.

Christopher then discussed student complaints about the removal of snacks and bottled beverages.

She then said that the beverages are the main reason students run out of their meal plan quickly. She said she would see students “load up on snacks and bottled beverages.” Getting rid of the snacks and bottled beverages would be “budget friendly” for the students, Christopher said.

This left most students with mixed emotions. Some found the meeting went as planned and some said the meeting “didn’t go anywhere.”

“We were just making talk and nothing was said or done,” Kathleen Tarr, a corporate communication student who lives on campus, said.

Other students, like medical-assisting major Isaiah Dorsey, felt the complete opposite.

“All the points that needed to be addressed were, and it was a step in the right direction,” Dorsey said.

For more information about the Town Hall in The Knight & Day Café, watch the video footage on YouTube.


To comment on this story or to suggest a story, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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Internship Fair and Student Scholarships Discussed on Episode #31

Central Penn College Education Foundation scholarship deadline is Aug. 7

By Paul Miller

Knightly News Co-Adviser

The Knightly News Podcast has released Episode #31, where we welcome Internship Coordinator Kristin Fike to talk about the upcoming Internship Fair and Associate Director of the Education Foundation Sandra Box to discuss their scholarship essay contest.

In our first segment with Fike, we discuss the importance of taking an internship (paid or unpaid), tips for success at the event, and some of the companies that will be represented.

Fike went on to discuss how to approach the internship process, “Even when you have a guest speaker in class or go on a field trip, you should always have your internship in mind.”

The Internship Fair will take place on July 25 from 10 a.m. to noon at the Conference Center at Central Penn College and is free to all Central Penn students.

Registration is required and can be made by following the link:  http://www.centralpenn.edu/about-central-penn/news-events-community/internship-fair/

Further questions can be relayed to Kristin Fike at kristinfike@centralpenn.edu.

Internship Fair

 

Episode #31 of the podcast also welcomes a new guest as Sandra Box, associate director of the Central Penn College Education Foundation, joins the show.

Also, the podcast is joined by former scholarship award-winner and Knightly News Vice President Yuliani Sutedjo.

The Education Foundation offers essay contests twice a year, in the summer and winter terms, and hopes to receive insight on students willingness to give back to the school and to the community, as well as things they are involved in on-campus.

These scholarships are open to all current Central Penn College students who:

  • Possess a 2.0 GPA
  • Have completed a FAFSA
  • Are a positive role model at Central Penn College
  • Are enrolled in a degree-seeking program

Sutedjo offers many pieces of advice, as she has won several of the awards during her time with the school, including engaging in the writing process and asking for assistance from the Learning Center.

You can find out more about what the Central Penn College Education Foundation does at their website:  http://www.centralpenn.edu/alumni-friends/education-foundation/

To apply for the scholarships:  http://foundation.centralpenn.edu

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Campus Bridge is a Link to the Future, and to the Past

By Destani Matthews

Knightly News Reporter

Central Penn College has been home to the 148-year-old Henszey’s Wrought Iron Bridge, a historic touch to the campus scenery, for over a decade.

This bridge has been one of the main attractions for not only prospective students, but the school’s surrounding community. The school’s former tagline that interweaved with having the historical piece is “Your Bridge to Success,” as well as making the school logo the outline of the bridge.

Henszey’s Wrought Iron Bridge is one of the historic treasurers on Central Penn's campus.

Henszey’s Wrought Iron Bridge is one of the historic treasures on Central Penn’s campus. Photo by Michael Lear-Olimpi

Former Central Penn College President Todd A. Milano bid on the bridge for just $22 from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; he was the only bidder. Before giving bridges away, the state first seeks to improve and reuse its historic bridges.

“If it can be rehabilitated, we’ll rehabilitate it – that’s our preference, especially from a historic preservation perspective,” Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) spokesperson Kara Russell told structuremag.com.

According to historicbridges.org, the bridge is 92 feet long, 17 feet wide and 9 feet high. Patented by Joseph G. Henszey in 1869, and built by the Continental Bridge Co. of Philadelphia, the shape of the wrought iron (a tough, pliable form of metal made for forging instead of casting) bridge is both bowstring (the braided steel cable) and arch.

The main purpose of the bridge was to carry Main Street traffic over Trout Creek in Slatington, Lehigh County. It functioned for nearly 80 years, carrying cars and milk trucks – loads heavier than the bridge was meant to hold.

It was later replaced by another bridge and moved to Wanamakers, also in Lehigh County, where it served to carry lighter traffic until the bridge was again moved to Greiner Industries in Mount Joy, Lancaster County, for restoration.

On Jan. 16, 2001, the Pennsylvania Department of General Services informed Central Penn College the school held the winning bid on the bridge. The historic bridge was set up at the college on May 6, 2002. Part of the agreement of buying any of the bridges specifies that they must be restored to meet Pennsylvania’s Secretary of the Interior’s standards.

According to The Washington Post, it’s important having the Henszey’s Bridge on Central Penn’s campus, for historical purposes.

“Historically, truss bridges were made to be moved, so it’s still in keeping with their historic nature to move them,” Russell told the Post.

The bridge’s influence on the spirit of Central Penn continues through appearances in the background of numerous college photos and videos, and the bridge continues to offer a beautiful and functional connection on campus, a unique landmark that no other place in the country has.


To comment on this story or to suggest a story, contact the KnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Edited by media club coadviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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Giving, and Receiving, Therapy — The Special Way

PTA students spend time with Special Olympians

Story and Photos

By Sarayuth Pinthong

Media Club Reporter and Photographer

MECHANICSBURG – About 50 Central Penn College physical therapy assistant (PTA) students, along with others from five area counties, participated in a Special Olympics event held at Messiah College, in April.

For the students, being a part of Central Penn’s PTA program provides opportunities they normally wouldn’t have in class. The Special Olympics event, consisting of around 1,150 athletes, was a chance to engage with special-needs individuals or “buddies.”

Central Penn PTA students withe their Special Olympics buddies.

Central Penn PTA students with their Special Olympics buddies.

“It exposes our PTA students to those with special needs in a playful environment while allowing them the chance to participate in an event that challenges their skills,” Prof. Jacki Rothschild, academic coordinator of clinical education at Central Penn College, said.

Students in various stages of the program learned from the event. Some students were surprised when they arrived on Messiah’s campus.

 

Working in the field

“It was a little overwhelming at first,” said Jordan Reichard, second-term PTA student.

Reichard was experienced working with kids, but the event presented new situations for him.

“I couldn’t communicate the way I normally would,” Reichard said about meeting his deaf “buddy,” referring to the buddy system approached used during the event, in which college students and Special Olympics students were one another’s “buddies,” or companions.

Reichard said he was able to connect with his “buddy.”

“At first, when I would kneel down to talk to her, she would move away,” he said. “By the end of the day, I got used to her mannerisms. She was a lot more comfortable, which made me more comfortable.”

Rewards for Reichard included allowing him to witness the importance of support for the athletes and their families.

“No matter who the patient is, there’s always a way to connect with them,” Reichard said.

 

A rigorous program

The PTA program is intense. Students spend many hours studying to complete it. But classroom learning always allow the best insight to what happens outside the classroom.

PTA students learned from their buddies.

PTA students learned from their buddies.

“My ‘buddy’ challenged me to step out of the physical aspect of therapy,” Amanda Harris, a PTA student in her last term, said. “My professors were diligent about being creative on reading your patients.”

Being able to adapt is important when connecting with patients.

“It’s good to have a plan,” Harris said. “But each person responds differently to different forms of communication and learning.”

She added that every situation is different and “you need to be ready to change.”

A good time, too

The event provided more than learning opportunities. Students collected memories they’ll carry long after the event.

“The didactic work that our students experience is one thing,” Rothschild said. “Our students take their buddy, the experiences they’ve collected, and carry it with them into future endeavors, creating a bond between the students and the Special Olympic athletes.”

A good Central Penn turnout for the Special Olympics at Messiah College recently.

A good Central Penn turnout for the Special Olympics at Messiah College recently.

Despite the challenges involved in meeting an individual for the first time and adapting to possibly extreme situations, the Central Penn PTA students were able to create memories with their buddies, while also having fun.


Sarayuth “Sy” Pinthong is the media club’s secretary and photographer/videographer.

To comment on this story, or to suggest a story idea, contact the KnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

 

 

 

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Miller Named Faculty Member of the Quarter

Media club co-adviser calls honor the ‘finest moment’ of his career

By Sherri Long

Knightly News Reporter

Prof. Paul Miller, co-adviser of the Knightly News Media Club at Central Penn College, received the college’s Faculty Member of the Quarter Award for the spring term (second quarter) last month.

The award recognizes “positive attitude toward work responsibilities, co-workers, students, and customers, and your willingness to take initiative for the good of the campus community,” according to the college’s description.

The award was Miller’s first at Central Penn.

New Paul pic

Professor Paul Miller with his Faculty Member of the Quarter Award certificate.  Photo by Sy Pinthong

“I had no idea that I’d even been nominated and found out in a Humanities and Sciences department meeting that I had won,” Miller said. “It is one of the highest honors a Central Penn College faculty (member) can achieve. I am truly honored that my department values me and my efforts.”

Candidates for the award are nominated by peers.

An excerpt of Miller’s nomination said, “Paul works tirelessly to help and aid students, advise the Knightly News Media Club, and build up the reputation and resources of the College. He bleeds Central Penn maroon and orange. I can think of no one more deserving of this award.”

Miller said receiving the award means a lot to him, professionally and personally.

“This, without a doubt, is the finest moment of my career,” he said. “Personally, the fact that I have the opportunity to spend my career with Central Penn College is amazing. It really means the world to me to have such supportive and caring colleagues that I get to work with every day.”


To comment on this story, or to suggest a story idea, contact the KnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Edited by Knightly News co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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Job and Internship Fair Tuesday

Central Penn joins other schools to help students and alumni find job leads

By Norman Geary
Knightly News Reporter

Career Services will participate in and is a sponsor of a job and internship fair by the Central Pennsylvania Employment Consortium (CPEC), on Feb. 21, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

The event will be held at the Radisson Hotel Harrisburg, in Camp Hill.

Many companies, transportation provided

Here is a list of participating companies and other information, including registration. Use the tabs on the left side of the page to find companies participating, and other information on CPEC and the fair.

Transportation will be provided from the Summerdale campus, with a van running several times during the event. To register for the job/internship fair, or arrange for transportation, email careerservices@centralpenn.edu.

Career Services personnel suggest that students who attend dress professionally for admission, and bring resumes to distribute to company representatives.

Career Services Director Steve Hassinger.

Career Services Director Steve Hassinger.

“This fair is a consortium of 18 different colleges and universities,” said Steve Hassinger, career services director. “So, we get employers to come to this event who would not come to one individual campus. Why? Because they are recruiting from 17 different campuses. This past year, we had 100 different companies represented.”

What are the benefits?

“This is a great event to make contacts with a lot of different companies that are going to offer jobs and internships, so if you are looking for an internship or a part-time job while you are in school, or if you are looking for a career opportunity once you graduate, this is a great opportunity to connect,” Hassinger said.

Students can meet representatives from federal, state and county agencies. In addition, students learn about the hiring process.

Attendees will also get a directory of employers at the fair.

There is nothing more focused at Central Penn College than the success of its graduates, Hassinger said. Central Penn graduates have an 85.8 percent rate finding employment in their field. Hassinger said graduates also find resources in Career Services of great value. All graduates have lifetime access to those services, and email.

On Friday, Hassinger said 89 companies had registered.

What does Career Services provide?

Central Penn’s Career Services provides a rich range of help to students and alums. These include:

• Simulated interviews.
• Online listing of positions.
• Company information.
• Job fairs and assistance to further education.
• Networking events and alumni mentors.

Along with these services, Central Penn Career Services assists students with individualized services, such as helping to craft resumes, and reviewing and making suggestions about LinkedIn profiles – and providing academic recommendations.
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To comment on this story, or to suggest a story, contact KnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Edited by Media Club Co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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