Category Archives: Central Penn College in the Community

Men’s Leadership Retreat and Upcoming General Election Subjects of Podcast #39

By Paul Miller

Knightly News Co-Adviser

The Knightly News Media Club at Central Penn College is excited to release our most recent podcast, Episode #39, featuring Admissions Counselor Curtis Voelker discussing the recent Men’s Leadership Retreat and Associate Residence Life Director Dillon Epler talking about how students can get involved in the Nov. 7 general election.

During the first segment, Voelker is also joined by Knightly News Correspondent Daylin Davis, a student who attended the Men’s Leadership Retreat.

They discussed the event, held at Diakon Wilderness Center in Boiling Springs, PA, with the theme of “leaving a legacy at Central Penn”.

Davis noted, “As a leader (on the Knights Men’s Basketball team), I have to give the work ethic that my teammates demand…I have to set an example and set the tone on the team.”

Davis was also quick to note that this opportunity provided him with a great deal of experience that he will be able to use immediately, both on and off the court.

Voelker and Epler led the retreat, something that means a lot to both of the individuals on both a personal and professional level.

During the second segment of the show, Epler joined the podcast to discuss the upcoming general election on Nov. 7, as well as discussing what Central Penn College is doing to promote participation in the election for our students.

Epler noted that while this isn’t a presidential or midterm election, making important decisions about your state and local officials has a much clearer impact on our students.

The Office of Residence Life will also be distributing information about the candidates on the ballot, will offer a shuttle to take students to the polls, and has plans for an open-forum event prior to the election to educate the students about the process.

Those looking for more information about the upcoming ballot in their area can search the links below for more information.

Vote 411:  http://www.vote411.org

BallotPedia:  https://ballotpedia.org/Pennsylvania_elections,_2017


 

This episode can also be found on SoundCloud:  https://soundcloud.com/user-511685837/episode-39-curtis-voelker-and-dillon-epler

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New club fair format scores again!

The change has brought more students to the event – with no classes missed.

 By Michael Lear-Olimpi

Knightly News Co-adviser and Editor

At least 100 students attended the second club fair that has been held at the beginning of a term, from 4 to 6 p.m. on Wednesday, in ATEC. About 15 clubs set up tables with information on mission and activities.

“I think it’s working better,” Activities Director Adrienne Thoman said about halfway through the fair. “I printed 100 passports, and they’re gone.”

Students get the paper passports stamped at each club table they visit. A full passport entitled its holder to a ticket, which was traded for wings with hot, Buffalo or Thai sauce, and french fries, in the Knight & Day Café.

In the summer, Thoman moved the club fair from noon to 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of a term to 4 to 6 p.m. on the first Wednesday in a term to allow more students – commuter, continuing-education and on-campus – to attend, because no classes are held then.

Prior to the change, some students – even club advisers – couldn’t attend the fair because they were in class. Even though some professors took or sent their classes to the noon club fairs, sometimes for class credit, not every professor did so, with some noon classes requiring the in-room time on club-fair day.

“We’ve had sign-ups, and we’ve had a lot of students stop by,” Britany Raber, president of the PTA Club, said around 5 p.m. “We’re different from some clubs, because members must be PTA majors.”

Raber agreed that more students can attend club fairs in the late afternoon and early evening.

Club Vice President Phalen Hazel and member Timothy Weaver staffed the table with Raber.

Officers and members of other clubs also saw brisk traffic.

“Yes, we’ve had people sign up,” Ashanti Conover, a member of the Central Penn Players theater club, said as she stood by the club’s table, which was topped with a dramatic poster. “They want to express themselves.”

Officers of Central Penn’s newest club, the Garden Club, were expecting a growth spurt.

“The club formed a little over two weeks ago, right before the term break,” President Carolyn Rodriquez said. “We’re going strong. People have joined today. We’re going to teach people about gardening, and help them grow plants. We’ll also talk about bees, composting, plants native to North America – different aspects of gardening.”

Interest in the gardening club wasn’t confined to students. Matthew Vickless, dean of the School of Professional Studies, joined, as did some faculty members.

Knight & Day Café staff said they prepared about 1,500 wings and “a lot of french fries.”


To comment on this story, or to suggest one, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.

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Upcoming Job Fair Highlights Visit from Harrisburg Regional Chamber VP of Operations

Kara Canale shares advice and opportunity for our students.

By Paul Miller

Knightly News Co-Adviser

The Knightly News Podcast offers our fans a special bonus edition over our break, welcoming Harrisburg Regional Chamber VP of Operations Kara Canale to the show.

Canale came to campus during the summer term to Professor Miller’s COM270:  Writing for Broadcast Media class to discuss opportunities in the community for students nearing graduation.  There were four students in the class that would be graduating in the next six months.

Canale started off discussions on the podcast be detailing her work outside of the classroom during her college career, which included a variety of internships.

In the second segment of the podcast, Canale discusses her role with the Harrisburg Regional Chamber and CREDC, a role she took on earlier this year, as well as how the local chamber can benefit local businesses.

Finally, discussions focused on Experience Harrisburg, a unique job fair happening in downtown Harrisburg on Sept. 28.

The job fair begins at the Whitaker Center for Science and the Arts at 3rd and Market Streets from 4:30 p.m. – 8 p.m. and also offers an opportunity to meet with the Harrisburg Young Professionals at Federal Taphouse from 6 p.m – 8 p.m.

More information about the event can be found by clicking here.  Local job postings, cost of living statistics, and many other opportunities are located at http://thelifeyouwantpa.com/

Experience HBG

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President Scolforo resigns

By Yuliani Sutedjo

Knightly News Reporter

Karen M. Scolforo, Central Penn’s ninth president, resigned Friday morning.

Scolforo, who was appointed president in mid-2013, said in a posting on her Facebook page, and later in a special edition of the college’s employee newsletter, Central Station, distributed at 10:20 a.m., “the Board (of directors) has agreed to accept my resignation, and to enact a well-thought out transition plan.”

The announcement was also made Friday in the student email newsletter Student Central.

Scolforo announced in an email to faculty and staff during the first week of September, and also in Central Station, that she had applied for a job as president of a university in New England, for family reasons.

“Many of you have heard me tout a family first mantra, and many have appreciated the support I’ve provided in this regard for all of our Central Penn College family members,” Scolforo wrote in the special edition of Central Station on Friday. “You’ll recall that on September 5th I published a special edition of Central Station to notify you of my decision to apply to a position closer to my family.”

On Friday afternoon, after she had left campus, Scolforo told The Knightly News: “My mother is sick, and I want to be closer to her, and help my family. I miss everyone (at Central Penn).”

Scolforo had applied to Castleton University, part of the Vermont university system, which has about full-time 2,000 students, in Castleton, Vt. She is one of three candidates, according to Castleton’s website.

Carol Wilson Spigner, D.S.W., chair of Central Penn’s board of directors, also told The Knightly News on Friday that Scolforo decided to resign for family reasons.

Scolforo declined Friday to address her candidacy at Castleton, but she said in her early-September message to the Central Penn community that the Castleton board of directors plans to make a decision by Oct. 1.

“Dr. Karen M. Scolforo has resigned from the presidency of Central Penn College for personal reasons,” the board of directors said in a message in Central Station Friday. “Dr. Linda Fedrizzi-Williams, vice president of academic affairs and Richard Varmecky, chief financial officer will serve as interim co-presidents and Carol W. Spigner, D.S.W. will serve as executive director of the college on behalf of the board. This team will provide continuity and stability during this period of transition. The Central Penn College board of directors will begin the process of selecting the next leader immediately.”

Scolforo applied to Castleton in late June. From Sept.11 through 13, she visited Castleton University, and gave a live presentation on the 13th. Some Central Penn College faculty and staff watched the Web broadcast of Scolforo’s presentation.

During her tenure, according to her curriculum vitae, Scolforo achieved many accomplishments for Central Penn, including:

  • Building The Underground, which includes the Capital BlueCross Theatre, a dance studio she sponsored, a weight room, student lounge and student government and other offices
  • Installation of a health-sciences building
  • Appointment of the school’s first diversity officer
  • Appointment of the school’s first Title IX and compliance officers

Yuliani Sutedjo is Student Government Association president and vice president of the Knightly News Media Club.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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No one outshines Rubina Azizdin, 2017 Luminary Award winner

Honor recognizes Central Penn staffer’s stellar accomplishments

 

Rubina Azizdin, winner of the 2017 Shining Star Award from the West Shore Chamber of Commerce’s Luminary Awards. A photoshoot and headshot, pictured above, from Bevrore, photo studio of Mechanicsburg, was one of the perks of being a Luminary Award nominee. Photo courtesy Rubina Azizdin.

Rubina Azizdin, winner of the 2017 Shining Star Award from the West Shore Chamber of Commerce’s Luminary Awards. A photoshoot and headshot, pictured above, from Bevrore, photo studio of Mechanicsburg, was one of the perks of being a Luminary Award nominee. Photo courtesy Rubina Azizdin.

By Sherri Long

Knightly News Reporter

Rubina Azizdin received the 2017 Shining Star Award on Aug. 30 as part of the West Shore Chamber of Commerce’s Luminary Awards, held in the Radisson Harrisburg, Camp Hill.

The Shining Star Award category recognizes a woman in a nonexecutive role who shows “excellence in their work environment and community,” according to the Chamber’s category description.

Azizdin, Central Penn career counselor and part-time faculty member, found out she was nominated in April, but does not know who nominated her.

“They never read or shared my nomination,” she said.

The Chamber learned a lot about the nominees, though. A survey of 40-50 questions about them, their hobbies, family, accomplishments and fun facts was sent to each nominee. The information was used throughout the Luminary Awards campaign and award luncheon.

Perks and fun facts

A perk the nominees enjoyed during the campaign was a photoshoot with Bevrore, a Mechanicsburg photo studio, and each nominee received a headshot photo to use for whatever reason she wants.

The headshots were also used in Luminary Awards advertisements the Chamber placed in online and printed publications, including Susquehanna Style magazine. Social media posts that featured each nominee’s headshot and a fun fact were also used throughout the campaign.

One of Azizdin’s fun facts, according to a Chamber social media post was, “Would want the following written on her tombstone: ‘Please leave me designer purses and shoes instead of flowers – I need to keep up with the latest fashion trends :)’”

“So, I’m known for my shopping addiction,” Azizdin said with a laugh. “I would die without fashion.”

Voting and networking

The winner was elected by a committee through a blind evaluation. Azizdin thought that was a fair process because, “We are a small community and we all know each other, so people didn’t win just because you knew somebody. … [The winner] was kept a secret the entire time.”

The Luminary Awards were created to celebrate business women in the community and “that’s what I’m all about,” said Azizdin.

Nominees met one another during a networking event held prior to the awards luncheon. Azizdin enjoyed being able to mingle with the other nominees.

“With a thing like this, there are so many people and usually you don’t know who you are up against, or you never get to speak to some of the people that you are a part of this process with,” she added. “It was nice to meet all the women up close and personal.”

After meeting the “phenomenal” nominated women, however, Azizdin wasn’t expecting to win. Still, she invited her entire family to come to the award luncheon.

“I said, ‘Look, this is a huge award, a huge event and I want you guys to be there. And, hey, if I don’t win, I still get to see you and then we get to go out and celebrate anyway.’”

Shocking surprise

Azizdin explained the winner-announcement process.

“They called all the nominees up one by one and introduced everybody,” Azizdin said. “But, I don’t even know what they said about me, because I was so nervous! All I remember is something about ice cream. Then we all sat down, and then, they announced my name as the winner.”

Azizdin said it took a few moments to realize she had won. She said she “froze for a bit” while she wondered whether they had really just called her name.

“I was in shock; I’m still in shock,” said Azizdin. “Somehow, I managed to remember to take my speech up with me. Once I got up there I was all right. I was still trying to catch my breath a little, while I started, but then I was okay.”

The Shining Star Award was the first time Azizdin was nominated for something at this level.

“It was awesome to have family and a lot of close friends there,” she said.

With a beaming smile on her face, Azizdin described the event as a “very energetic, fun — you know, just an amazing, glorious type of environment that day.”

Paying it forward

As the winner, Azizdin chose a nonprofit to receive part of the funds raised by the event. She chose the Junior Achievement organization because “it falls in line with everything I’m doing and trying to help out in the community with.”

Junior Achievement helps high school students prepare for the “real world,” through training in subjects such as financial literacy, work readiness and entrepreneurship, according to the Junior Achievement website.

“It’s kind of a training program to better them for their college careers,” Azizdin said.

Azizdin has been involved with the West Shore Chamber of Commerce since she started working for Central Penn, which was “about five years” ago. She isn’t involved directly with the Chamber, but is involved with several organizations that are a part of the Chamber, such as West Shore Young Professionals and American Business Women’s Association.

Azizdin plans to become more involved with the Chamber, after her experience. She loved the award process experience, as well as how the Chamber gives back to the community.

“I want to pay it forward, so, I might be serving on a committee for them, or something like that, in the future,” Azizdin said.

Central Penn College was well represented in the Luminary Awards. Sandra Box, associate director of the Central Penn College Education Foundation, was also a Shining Star nominee.

Cami Ressler, chair of the Education Foundation’s board of trustees, was a nominee for the Visionary Award, which recognizes a female executive community leader.


Sherri Long is president of the Knightly News Media Club @ Central Penn College.

To comment on this story or to suggest one, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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by | September 14, 2017 · 7:18 pm

Knight Owl always-open computer lab for students nests in Bollinger

By Brian Christiana, Amor Duran, Nasi Hayes, Katina Hocker, Laura Lee, Megan Smith, Quinyece Walker and Joel Zola

Students of COM 140, Summer 2017

Special to The Knightly News

In August, Central Penn College opened in Bollinger Hall what sources contacted for this story believe is the school’s first  24-hour, seven-day-a-week computer lab for students.

Students seem to like the additional resource, which includes 21 computers and a printer.

“It is great for the students that live in the apartments and Super Suites,” Student Government Association President Yuliani Sutedjo, a corporate communication major, said.

Valeri Hartman, IT help desk administrator, said the need for a new computer lab has been growing since the merger of the learning and writing centers at the start of summer term. The merger left students with only the library and Advanced Technology Education Center (ATEC) computer lab, in 300, neither of which is open past 10 p.m.

Because Room 41 was across from the Security Department, IT and other personnel saw a perfect opportunity to make the lab 24-7 access.

The lab is open on holidays, even though the college may be closed, Hartman said. Some resident students remain on campus on holidays.

“One of the challenges professors face is not having enough computers for students both in and out of the classroom,” Hartman said. “We’re trying to find a solution for that.”

Prof. Micaiah Smith-Morris said the Knight Owl Computer Lab is good, because a limit on students’ “time is no longer an issue.”

It is, “Clearly communicating an emphasis on academic achievement,” Smith-Morris said.

Bollinger 41 was selected as the location for the room because of its proximity to the security office. Hartman explained that with the lab being open all night, having the office across the hall will put students at ease no matter the time.

The location also provides convenience for on-campus students who will no longer have to walk cross campus to access a computer.

 

Working on extended support time

IT support is not available at the Knight Owl Computer Lab after 3 p.m. Help is available from the Central Penn IT helpdesk from 8 a.m. to 3.

Hartman understands that’s a problem that needs to be dealt with.

“We are working on it,” Hartman said.

Hartman gave some examples of what IT can do to fix the problem.

“Maybe some of the staff can stay later in the evening, till 8-9,” Hartman said. “It’s just a thought.”

She added there is no deadline for providing on-site IT support after 3 p.m., or whether doing so will be possible.

 

Equipment nuts and bolts

“The computers, monitors, keyboards and mice in the Knight Owl lab are all brand new and include three-year warranties on the hardware,” IT Director Tom Parker said.

IT workers had to re-cable all of Bollinger 41, which had been a classroom without student computers, so the computers could match up with outlets.

“A new network switch was added, and a wireless access point was also added to increase the density of available connections in the room,” Parker wrote in an email.

“The total cost per computer is $695,” according to Parker. “That includes the PC with three-year warranty, monitor, keyboard, mouse and the needed video adapter to connect the monitors.”

The total for computers and their accessories came to $14,595. Parker said the re-cabling, network switch, wireless access point and other accoutrements cost about $6,000. He said the approximately $21,000 spent on the lab came from the IT budget and did not require extra funds. Central Penn recently made fiscal cuts across the college to set a budget for the upcoming fiscal year.

The school tries to buy the same computers that are used in other rooms, but it’s not always possible because hardware changes every year. The computers in the Knight Owl lab are Dell computers and are similar to the 100 computers replaced in 2016 in ATEC, Parker said.

No work should be saved to the computer desktops because the computers delete information stored there overnight, as in the rest of the labs.

A security camera was installed in the room as well. If there are any technical issues overnight or on holidays, then students can submit a helpdesk ticket by emailing to helpdesk@centralpenn.edu  or by calling (866) 291-HELP (4357), and leaving a voicemail explaining what the issue is. Students can expect to receive an email answer during the following day.

Hartman suggested using the OneDrive account through Office 365, and to always log out when finished.


To comment on this story, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi, who directed this editorial project, and contributed a small amount of information to the reporting.

 

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Common Hour focuses on Knight & Day Café meal plan, food choices

By Darren Greene

Knightly News Reporter

Central Penn College had a weekly common hour town hall meeting in August with representatives of The Knight & Day Café, and results of the meeting left students with mixed emotions.

This town hall meeting was a way for students to voice their concerns about the cafe. Kathy Christopher, general manager of the cafe, was there to answer questions.

She addressed nine students at a table in the cafe.

Christopher started the conversation by talking about the meal plan at Central Penn College. She explained that a basic meal plan of $690 is not enough for most of Central Penn students. She said her research of “hundreds” of college meal plans found the lowest was $3,600.

Christopher then discussed student complaints about the removal of snacks and bottled beverages.

She then said that the beverages are the main reason students run out of their meal plan quickly. She said she would see students “load up on snacks and bottled beverages.” Getting rid of the snacks and bottled beverages would be “budget friendly” for the students, Christopher said.

This left most students with mixed emotions. Some found the meeting went as planned and some said the meeting “didn’t go anywhere.”

“We were just making talk and nothing was said or done,” Kathleen Tarr, a corporate communication student who lives on campus, said.

Other students, like medical-assisting major Isaiah Dorsey, felt the complete opposite.

“All the points that needed to be addressed were, and it was a step in the right direction,” Dorsey said.

For more information about the Town Hall in The Knight & Day Café, watch the video footage on YouTube.


To comment on this story or to suggest a story, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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Theatrical showcase ‘Passions’ set to premiere on campus

By Darren Greene

Knightly News Reporter

Students, staff and community members are working on a theatrical showcase called “Passions,” set for Sept. 6-9, in the Capital BlueCross Theatre, discussed at length in our most recent podcast, episode #37.

A free preview for the Central Penn community will be presented at 5 p.m. on Sept. 6.

The rest of the shows, on Sept. 7, 8 and 9, will begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $3 for students and $5 general admission.  Tickets for the individual shows are available by clicking here.

A dinner-and-a-show combination will be available on Sept. 9, starting at 6 p.m., in the Knight and Day Café Lounge. The cost for the Italian-food dinner is $10 for students and $15 general admission.  Tickets for the dinner-and-a-show are available by clicking here.

This is a production of monologues and short plays on the theme of passion. Each performance lasts 10-15 minutes. The overall play will be 75 minutes long, without an intermission.

The cast consists of eight students. There are also three staff members and three community members, for a total of 14 people acting in this play.

When asked if this showcase is similar to the monologue play “A Memory, A Monologue, A Rant And A Prayer,” performed in the winter term, Theater Director Janet Bixler made it clear that it is not.

Bixler explained that the monologue done in the winter term “consisted of a production of staged readings that was written from public authors and it was to raise awareness of violence (against) women and children.”

 

“Passions” consists of monologues, scenes and short plays from a variety of famous authors on the theme of passion.

There is going to be content from Shakespeare to contemporary playwrights.

This will also be a more playful and comedic showcase but also have serious moments.

When asked why make a theatrical showcase, Bixler explained why this was a better idea for productions in the future.

“The creation of a traditional-run play has … become difficult due to … students’ daily schedules,” Bixler said.

By making a theatrical showcase, not all students involved have to rehearse together as they would in a traditional play. This makes it flexible for the students to be able to come to practice and not have it conflict with their other commitments.

In the second segment of our podcast, Adrienne Thoman joins the show with Knightly News Reporters Ian Kemmerer and Michael Ademola discussing September events.

Thoman is also starring in the upcoming “Passions” production, and features this in Adrienne’s Featured Three.

For more information on “Passions,” visit the Capital BlueCross Theatre at Central Penn College’s Facebook page.


To comment on this story or to suggest a story, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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A group of gallant Knights explores Toronto while lending a helping hand

Four-day odyssey is a learning and living

experience of culture and service

 Part two of two.

 Story and photos

By Yuliani Sutedjo

 Knightly News Reporter

 TORONTO – Hi, everyone. Follow me in my story on the four-day journey I took with other students and some staff to Canada in April.

Eight Central Penn students, all from the Summerdale campus except one from the Lancaster center, rendezvoused at the college on a day in early April, at 6 a.m., for the annual alternative term-break trip run by the diversity office, to provide community service— in Toronto. Two Central Penn staff members also went on the trip.

It was windy and chilly, and not fully light.

By 6:15 a.m., we hit the road to Canada.

(Read the first part of the story.)

Day 3

The next day, I woke up around 8:30 a.m., took a shower and went to a supermarket. Around 10 a.m., I went back to the hostel and decided to walk around the Kensington area.

I also wanted to try some jerk chicken. When I went to Toronto last year, I didn’t get to try it, because when we arrived to the store, they were about to close and had only a bit left. This year, I walked into the store around 10:50 a.m. They told me they weren’t open yet — not until 11. I took another walk around the complex and came back at 11:10. I went in and debated whether to a get small or a medium order. I decided to get medium.

Man, when I opened the box, the aroma of the chicken and spices was strong, and the food was delicious. It’s the best lunch I ever had in my entire life. It was fried perfectly — was nice and crisp, and also grilled. The chicken was really tasty. I saved a bit for dinner, because I was full when I ate half the portion.

Arlene Throness, a professor at Ryerson University, shows students a plot in the rooftop garden.

Arlene Throness, a professor at Ryerson University, shows students a plot in the rooftop garden.

When lunch was done, the group met at 11:45 to go to Ryerson University to see a rooftop garden. This rooftop garden was created by a student studying to become a nutritionist. We also met with a professor named Arlene Throness. Throness was so enthusiastic to show us the garden that she gave us a tour and explained the history of the rooftop garden, and what type of plants are in the garden.

We got to try fresh vegetables from the garden, such as spinach, sage, mint, chives and garlic.

The day didn’t end there, though. We went to visit the CN Tower.  The tower opened to the public in 1975. It is named for the Canadian National railroad, which doesn’t own it anymore. It is 1,815 tall, and until 2007 was the world’s tallest free-standing structure, and tallest tower. I visited this last year, so Sovit, Megan and I decided to wait for the other students who wanted to go up to the observation deck. Right after the CN Tower excursion, and after an hour of waiting, we came into a bit of trouble. Romeo decided to buy a poncho. He used the credit card he had, and swiped it at the cash register.

Ooooopps.

The card didn’t work. There is a back story. When Romeo and the others went to Casa Loma, the clerk asked Romeo for his ID, and found that the name didn’t match the name on the card. Romeo explained that it was the school’s card, and he was authorized to use it, but the cashier continued to say he couldn’t, but eventually did it anyway. Romeo called the bank and they promised to take care of the problem, and said Romeo would be able to use the card the next day. But before the situation was corrected, the bank clerk would give us only $200 to spend for the day. We were supposed to go to Ward’s Island, in Lake Ontario, but we cancelled — along with the dinner we were supposed to have together.

Well, because the island trip got cancelled, we decided to go to the Art Gallery of Ontario.

We finished seeing the museum around 7:15 p.m. and decided to have dinner in the Kensington area, near the hostel. I decided to eat my leftover jerk chicken. Megan and I decided to buy some sodas, for some caffeine, to prepare for the next day, because we both needed to pay attention to the road.

It was bittersweet that Wednesday would be our last day in Toronto.

Day 4

We all woke up at 7 a.m. and departed Toronto by 7:15, on toward Niagara Falls.

The weather was rainy and windy.

Urgh.

We arrived at Niagara Falls around 9:20, and it was still raining, and the gift shop wasn’t open yet. We left Niagara Falls around 9:40 a.m. for home.

Around 10:20, we ate at a gas station in New York, and right after that, we hit the road again.

Once again, there were hills, mountains, fields and windmills, and we passed the lake we had seen on the way up a few days before. By 12:47 p.m., we were in Pennsylvania, and by 2:48, we saw the Welcome to Harrisburg sign. We arrived in Summerdale around 3:15 p.m.

Overall, it was a great trip! We got to volunteer at the food bank, and enjoy the diversity of the Kensington neighborhood of Toronto.

Come and join this program next year!


 

For information on the alternative term-break trip, contact Romeo Azondekon.

To comment on a story or to suggest a story idea, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Yuliani Sutedjo is vice president of The Knightly News Media Club @ Central Penn College.

She is also Central Penn College Student Government Association president.

Edited by club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

 

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A group of gallant Knights explores Toronto while lending a helping hand

Four-day odyssey is a learning and living

experience of culture and service

Part one of two.

Story and photos

By Yuliani Sutedjo

Knightly News Reporter

Day 1

TORONTO – Hi, everyone. Follow me in my story on the four-day journey I took with other students and some staff to Canada in April.

Eight Central Penn students, all from the Summerdale campus except one from the Lancaster center, rendezvoused at the college on a day in early April, at 6 a.m., for the annual alternative term-break trip run by the diversity office, to provide community service— in Toronto. Two Central Penn staff members also went on the trip.

It was windy and chilly, and not fully light.

By 6:15 a.m., we hit the road to Canada.

On the way up Interstate 81 through Pennsylvania and into New York state – up, up, up toward Niagara Falls, and Canada – we passed towns and cities, mountains, farms, rivers, lakes and windmills.

We drove on and on, in two cars.

After about 300 miles, we arrived at the Canadian border at about 11:37 a.m.

When we reached the border crossing, the Canadian border guard at the gate asked Megan Cline, Central Penn counselor, some questions such as, where we were from, what we would be doing in Canada, and where we would stay and where we would go while in Canada. The officer’s tone was intense; she seemed like a drill sergeant.

Once through the grilling, and the gate, it took another hour and a half to arrive at the College Backpackers Hostel, in Toronto’s Kensington neighborhood.At 1:30 p.m., we got our room, had a quick nap for an hour, and then came back to meet up around 2:45 to have lunch at the Toronto Eaton Centre mall.

View from hostel window

This is the view from my hostel room window.

Some of us ate Chinese food and others had Indian food, while still others had food from Tim Hortons, a fast-food bistro. After a quick lunch, we explored the mall. The mall has a UNIQLo clothing store, among many others. I looked for some items, and then went to hunt a bubble tea at a place called Chatime. We went back to the hostel around 6.

The day was done. Some of us decided to rest or go to sleep, and some of us decided to watch a movie with Romeo Azondekon, Central Penn’s chief diversity officer. I decided to go to bed around 10 p.m., and skip the movie.

 

Day 2

It was like the day before when we left Pennsylvania – cloudy, windy and raining, but we set out for our destination. The group of us arrived at the North York Harvest Food Bank around 9:50 a.m. We were greeted by Leslie Venturainol and Kadian Clarke. In the food bank, we had the chance to volunteer. Our task was to look for a good can of food, make sure the food was not expired and then to put it in the right storage box. We were proud to volunteer and feed 100 families.

At the North York Harvest Food Bank with Kadian Clarke and Leslie Venturainol.

At the North York Harvest Food Bank with Kadian Clarke and Leslie Venturainol.

The day wasn’t over then, though. We were very hungry and decided to buy lunch at the Eaton Centre, around 1 p.m. Right after lunch, Belinda Rivera, Jasmine Harvey, Danielle Gilbert, Sovit Adhikari, Paul Jones, and Romeo went to the Casa Loma landmark and museum. Megan, and Linda Brown, Johnny McGee, Tiyana Butler and I went back to the hostel. Casa Loma is beautiful. It looks partly like an old castle. My favorite part is the top tower. I was there on another trip.

Around 5 p.m., the group went back to the hostel. An hour late, Romeo, Belinda, Paul and I went to a nearby supermarket to shop for dinner. We came back around 6:45 and started to cook. We had chicken, rice, soup beans, green beans and boiled potatoes.

Sovit Adhikari, Jasmine Harvey, Tiyana Butler, Linda Brown, Paul Jones and Danielle Gilbert make supper at the hostel.

Sovit Adhikari (background, left), Jasmine Harvey, Tiyana Butler, Linda Brown, Paul Jones and Danielle Gilbert make supper at the hostel.

During dinner, we talked about who our favorite actor and our favorite singer is, and discussed what we liked about Central Penn College. Right after dinner, Belinda, Danielle, Johnny, Jasmine, Linda and Tiyana decided to go to the Ripley Aquarium. The aquarium closed at 11 p.m., so they wanted to get going.

When they were finished touring the aquarium, the students were waiting to get picked up around 11 p.m. Meanwhile, I stayed at the hostel to get some rest. All of a sudden, my phone vibrated. It was a text from Central Penn student Mbuyi “Steve-O” Osango, who had already been in Toronto. Steve-O came to visit, and spent two and a half hours at the hostel. During his visit, around 11:15, Tiyana called Steve-O so she could talk to me, because she couldn’t reach me – my phone was out of data.

“Is Romeo on his way?” she asked me.

“I guess so,” I said.

Because I wasn’t sure if Romeo was on his way to pick the group up at the aquarium, and my phone was no use, I went to the guys’ room, where Romeo was staying for the trip, to confirm that he was on his way to pick the students up.

“Yes,” they said.

Another phone call came in around 11:25. Romeo still wasn’t there, and it was cold. That’s when Megan decided to pick the group up.

Some people, including me, didn’t have data, so we were depending on the Wi-Fi.

As Megan went to pick them up, I kept in touch with everyone in the group chat and Steve-O decided to get some food at Subway. Fifteen minutes later, Romeo came in with Steve-O, whom he met outside the hostel, where he had been waiting for the call to pick the group up.

It turned out there were some miscommunication and technology issues. Eventually, though, we all settled down, and things were cleared up.


Editor’s note: Watch for the next installment of this story!


To comment on a story or to suggest a story idea, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Yuliani Sutedjo is vice president of The Knightly News Media Club @ Central Penn College.

She is also Central Penn College Student Government Association president.

Edited by club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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