Author Archives: mlearolimpi

Knight Owl always-open computer lab for students nests in Bollinger

By Brian Christiana, Amor Duran, Nasi Hayes, Katina Hocker, Laura Lee, Megan Smith, Quinyece Walker and Joel Zola

Students of COM 140, Summer 2017

Special to The Knightly News

In August, Central Penn College opened in Bollinger Hall what sources contacted for this story believe is the school’s first  24-hour, seven-day-a-week computer lab for students.

Students seem to like the additional resource, which includes 21 computers and a printer.

“It is great for the students that live in the apartments and Super Suites,” Student Government Association President Yuliani Sutedjo, a corporate communication major, said.

Valeri Hartman, IT help desk administrator, said the need for a new computer lab has been growing since the merger of the learning and writing centers at the start of summer term. The merger left students with only the library and Advanced Technology Education Center (ATEC) computer lab, in 300, neither of which is open past 10 p.m.

Because Room 41 was across from the Security Department, IT and other personnel saw a perfect opportunity to make the lab 24-7 access.

The lab is open on holidays, even though the college may be closed, Hartman said. Some resident students remain on campus on holidays.

“One of the challenges professors face is not having enough computers for students both in and out of the classroom,” Hartman said. “We’re trying to find a solution for that.”

Prof. Micaiah Smith-Morris said the Knight Owl Computer Lab is good, because a limit on students’ “time is no longer an issue.”

It is, “Clearly communicating an emphasis on academic achievement,” Smith-Morris said.

Bollinger 41 was selected as the location for the room because of its proximity to the security office. Hartman explained that with the lab being open all night, having the office across the hall will put students at ease no matter the time.

The location also provides convenience for on-campus students who will no longer have to walk cross campus to access a computer.

 

Working on extended support time

IT support is not available at the Knight Owl Computer Lab after 3 p.m. Help is available from the Central Penn IT helpdesk from 8 a.m. to 3.

Hartman understands that’s a problem that needs to be dealt with.

“We are working on it,” Hartman said.

Hartman gave some examples of what IT can do to fix the problem.

“Maybe some of the staff can stay later in the evening, till 8-9,” Hartman said. “It’s just a thought.”

She added there is no deadline for providing on-site IT support after 3 p.m., or whether doing so will be possible.

 

Equipment nuts and bolts

“The computers, monitors, keyboards and mice in the Knight Owl lab are all brand new and include three-year warranties on the hardware,” IT Director Tom Parker said.

IT workers had to re-cable all of Bollinger 41, which had been a classroom without student computers, so the computers could match up with outlets.

“A new network switch was added, and a wireless access point was also added to increase the density of available connections in the room,” Parker wrote in an email.

“The total cost per computer is $695,” according to Parker. “That includes the PC with three-year warranty, monitor, keyboard, mouse and the needed video adapter to connect the monitors.”

The total for computers and their accessories came to $14,595. Parker said the re-cabling, network switch, wireless access point and other accoutrements cost about $6,000. He said the approximately $21,000 spent on the lab came from the IT budget and did not require extra funds. Central Penn recently made fiscal cuts across the college to set a budget for the upcoming fiscal year.

The school tries to buy the same computers that are used in other rooms, but it’s not always possible because hardware changes every year. The computers in the Knight Owl lab are Dell computers and are similar to the 100 computers replaced in 2016 in ATEC, Parker said.

No work should be saved to the computer desktops because the computers delete information stored there overnight, as in the rest of the labs.

A security camera was installed in the room as well. If there are any technical issues overnight or on holidays, then students can submit a helpdesk ticket by emailing to helpdesk@centralpenn.edu  or by calling (866) 291-HELP (4357), and leaving a voicemail explaining what the issue is. Students can expect to receive an email answer during the following day.

Hartman suggested using the OneDrive account through Office 365, and to always log out when finished.


To comment on this story, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi, who directed this editorial project, and contributed a small amount of information to the reporting.

 

Leave a Comment

Filed under Central Penn College in the Community, On Campus Happenings

Common Hour focuses on Knight & Day Café meal plan, food choices

By Darren Greene

Knightly News Reporter

Central Penn College had a weekly common hour town hall meeting in August with representatives of The Knight & Day Café, and results of the meeting left students with mixed emotions.

This town hall meeting was a way for students to voice their concerns about the cafe. Kathy Christopher, general manager of the cafe, was there to answer questions.

She addressed nine students at a table in the cafe.

Christopher started the conversation by talking about the meal plan at Central Penn College. She explained that a basic meal plan of $690 is not enough for most of Central Penn students. She said her research of “hundreds” of college meal plans found the lowest was $3,600.

Christopher then discussed student complaints about the removal of snacks and bottled beverages.

She then said that the beverages are the main reason students run out of their meal plan quickly. She said she would see students “load up on snacks and bottled beverages.” Getting rid of the snacks and bottled beverages would be “budget friendly” for the students, Christopher said.

This left most students with mixed emotions. Some found the meeting went as planned and some said the meeting “didn’t go anywhere.”

“We were just making talk and nothing was said or done,” Kathleen Tarr, a corporate communication student who lives on campus, said.

Other students, like medical-assisting major Isaiah Dorsey, felt the complete opposite.

“All the points that needed to be addressed were, and it was a step in the right direction,” Dorsey said.

For more information about the Town Hall in The Knight & Day Café, watch the video footage on YouTube.


To comment on this story or to suggest a story, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Central Penn College in the Community, On Campus Happenings

Theatrical showcase ‘Passions’ set to premiere on campus

By Darren Greene

Knightly News Reporter

Students, staff and community members are working on a theatrical showcase called “Passions,” set for Sept. 6-9, in the Capital BlueCross Theatre, discussed at length in our most recent podcast, episode #37.

A free preview for the Central Penn community will be presented at 5 p.m. on Sept. 6.

The rest of the shows, on Sept. 7, 8 and 9, will begin at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $3 for students and $5 general admission.  Tickets for the individual shows are available by clicking here.

A dinner-and-a-show combination will be available on Sept. 9, starting at 6 p.m., in the Knight and Day Café Lounge. The cost for the Italian-food dinner is $10 for students and $15 general admission.  Tickets for the dinner-and-a-show are available by clicking here.

This is a production of monologues and short plays on the theme of passion. Each performance lasts 10-15 minutes. The overall play will be 75 minutes long, without an intermission.

The cast consists of eight students. There are also three staff members and three community members, for a total of 14 people acting in this play.

When asked if this showcase is similar to the monologue play “A Memory, A Monologue, A Rant And A Prayer,” performed in the winter term, Theater Director Janet Bixler made it clear that it is not.

Bixler explained that the monologue done in the winter term “consisted of a production of staged readings that was written from public authors and it was to raise awareness of violence (against) women and children.”

 

“Passions” consists of monologues, scenes and short plays from a variety of famous authors on the theme of passion.

There is going to be content from Shakespeare to contemporary playwrights.

This will also be a more playful and comedic showcase but also have serious moments.

When asked why make a theatrical showcase, Bixler explained why this was a better idea for productions in the future.

“The creation of a traditional-run play has … become difficult due to … students’ daily schedules,” Bixler said.

By making a theatrical showcase, not all students involved have to rehearse together as they would in a traditional play. This makes it flexible for the students to be able to come to practice and not have it conflict with their other commitments.

In the second segment of our podcast, Adrienne Thoman joins the show with Knightly News Reporters Ian Kemmerer and Michael Ademola discussing September events.

Thoman is also starring in the upcoming “Passions” production, and features this in Adrienne’s Featured Three.

For more information on “Passions,” visit the Capital BlueCross Theatre at Central Penn College’s Facebook page.


To comment on this story or to suggest a story, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Central Penn College in the Community, On Campus Happenings

ATEC evacuated

Some people in the building felt ill.

Fire department finds no danger.

Air-quality testing set for Thursday.

Story and photos

By Sarayuth Pinthong

Knightly News Reporter

More than 100 people were evacuated from the Advanced Technology Education Center (ATEC) just before 11 a.m. Tuesday because of concerns about air quality in the building after some employees felt ill.

Around 9 a.m., Ronald Amoriello, chief public safety director, received a report of several staff members complaining of headaches and dizziness while in ATEC suite 203/205. Amoriello responded to the location and met with the individuals.

Central Penn Chief Public Safety Director meets with firefighters in the ATEC lobby Tuesday morning to discuss checking air quality after the evacuation. Photo by Sarayuth Pinthong

Central Penn Chief Public Safety Director Ron Amoriello meets with firefighters in the ATEC lobby Tuesday morning to discuss checking air quality after the evacuation. 

“I got them out of the suite they were in and did some testing (of the building’s electronics systems) to make sure all our systems were up and running,” Amoriello said.

They were.

After checking the first and second floors, Amoriello decided to call the East Pennsboro Fire Department to have air-quality checks done.

“We just wanted to make sure that we didn’t have any … issues with contaminants in the air,” Amoriello said.

A CP Alert warning was sent by phone and email at 11:07 a.m. to all employees and students, advising them of the ATEC evacuation, and asking people to stay away from the area.

East Pennsboro’s Northeast Fire & Rescue Station #1, Summerdale, was dispatched about 10:30 a.m. The truck and firefighters arrived quickly from the firehouse on Third Street, near the college.

According to Fire Chief Josh Matter, six to eight people who had been in ATEC required evaluation by emergency medical services personnel. One person was transported to a local hospital for evaluation of an unrelated condition, and returned to the college later in the afternoon.

“We got on scene and did multimeter sweeps,” Matter said. “When more manpower arrived, we conducted another sweep with different multimeters.”

Only normal levels of gases were found in the building, no more than anyone would find in a safe home, Amoriello said.

Fire trucks on Valley Road outside ATEC, and in the front lot. Photo by Sarayuth Pinthong.

Fire trucks on Valley Road outside ATEC, and in the front lot.

The “multimeter” tests can detect a variety of gases and other contaminants from fuels in air, according to Amoriello.

Because no readings indicating trouble were found, Matter decided to evacuate the area where people who felt ill had been.

He then instructed Facilities Department personnel to turn on the heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) system to conduct a test from the affected room. Another test was conducted after about 20 minutes, and no readings indicating a problem were found. Matter told Central Penn officials about an hour after firefighters arrived that people could return to the building and resume normal activities.

A CP Alert at 11:28 a.m. told recipients – employees and students – that tests of air quality in ATEC detected no threat and the fire department declared the building safe to enter.

East Pennsboro Township ambulances at the curb on B Street, checking people who had felt ill in ATEC. Photo by Sarayuth Pinthong.

East Pennsboro Township ambulances at the curb on B Street, checking people who had felt ill in ATEC.

Faculty members whose offices are in ATEC203/205 worked in Bollinger Hall while firefighters checked ATEC. Some faculty members who felt ill in the morning assigned Blackboard days for their classes.

Amoriello said an outside firm will conduct air-quality tests in ATEC on Thursday morning. He stated in an email sent at 12:43 p.m. to employees that the Public Safety and Facilities departments “will continue to monitor the situation.”

The last air-quality test in ATEC was conducted about two months ago by an outside agency. No contaminants were found.

East Pennsboro fire police directed traffic on Valley Road away from B Street while firefighters checked ATEC. Two ambulances from East Pennsboro Township Emergency Medical Services parked on the ATEC side of B Street. Medics assessed people who felt ill.

Susquehanna Township’s Heavy Rescue unit 37 and the Hampden Township Fire Department assisted, as did East Pennsboro Township Police.


To comment on this story or to suggest a story, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi, who contributed to the reporting.

Leave a Comment

Filed under On Campus Happenings

A group of gallant Knights explores Toronto while lending a helping hand

Four-day odyssey is a learning and living

experience of culture and service

 Part two of two.

 Story and photos

By Yuliani Sutedjo

 Knightly News Reporter

 TORONTO – Hi, everyone. Follow me in my story on the four-day journey I took with other students and some staff to Canada in April.

Eight Central Penn students, all from the Summerdale campus except one from the Lancaster center, rendezvoused at the college on a day in early April, at 6 a.m., for the annual alternative term-break trip run by the diversity office, to provide community service— in Toronto. Two Central Penn staff members also went on the trip.

It was windy and chilly, and not fully light.

By 6:15 a.m., we hit the road to Canada.

(Read the first part of the story.)

Day 3

The next day, I woke up around 8:30 a.m., took a shower and went to a supermarket. Around 10 a.m., I went back to the hostel and decided to walk around the Kensington area.

I also wanted to try some jerk chicken. When I went to Toronto last year, I didn’t get to try it, because when we arrived to the store, they were about to close and had only a bit left. This year, I walked into the store around 10:50 a.m. They told me they weren’t open yet — not until 11. I took another walk around the complex and came back at 11:10. I went in and debated whether to a get small or a medium order. I decided to get medium.

Man, when I opened the box, the aroma of the chicken and spices was strong, and the food was delicious. It’s the best lunch I ever had in my entire life. It was fried perfectly — was nice and crisp, and also grilled. The chicken was really tasty. I saved a bit for dinner, because I was full when I ate half the portion.

Arlene Throness, a professor at Ryerson University, shows students a plot in the rooftop garden.

Arlene Throness, a professor at Ryerson University, shows students a plot in the rooftop garden.

When lunch was done, the group met at 11:45 to go to Ryerson University to see a rooftop garden. This rooftop garden was created by a student studying to become a nutritionist. We also met with a professor named Arlene Throness. Throness was so enthusiastic to show us the garden that she gave us a tour and explained the history of the rooftop garden, and what type of plants are in the garden.

We got to try fresh vegetables from the garden, such as spinach, sage, mint, chives and garlic.

The day didn’t end there, though. We went to visit the CN Tower.  The tower opened to the public in 1975. It is named for the Canadian National railroad, which doesn’t own it anymore. It is 1,815 tall, and until 2007 was the world’s tallest free-standing structure, and tallest tower. I visited this last year, so Sovit, Megan and I decided to wait for the other students who wanted to go up to the observation deck. Right after the CN Tower excursion, and after an hour of waiting, we came into a bit of trouble. Romeo decided to buy a poncho. He used the credit card he had, and swiped it at the cash register.

Ooooopps.

The card didn’t work. There is a back story. When Romeo and the others went to Casa Loma, the clerk asked Romeo for his ID, and found that the name didn’t match the name on the card. Romeo explained that it was the school’s card, and he was authorized to use it, but the cashier continued to say he couldn’t, but eventually did it anyway. Romeo called the bank and they promised to take care of the problem, and said Romeo would be able to use the card the next day. But before the situation was corrected, the bank clerk would give us only $200 to spend for the day. We were supposed to go to Ward’s Island, in Lake Ontario, but we cancelled — along with the dinner we were supposed to have together.

Well, because the island trip got cancelled, we decided to go to the Art Gallery of Ontario.

We finished seeing the museum around 7:15 p.m. and decided to have dinner in the Kensington area, near the hostel. I decided to eat my leftover jerk chicken. Megan and I decided to buy some sodas, for some caffeine, to prepare for the next day, because we both needed to pay attention to the road.

It was bittersweet that Wednesday would be our last day in Toronto.

Day 4

We all woke up at 7 a.m. and departed Toronto by 7:15, on toward Niagara Falls.

The weather was rainy and windy.

Urgh.

We arrived at Niagara Falls around 9:20, and it was still raining, and the gift shop wasn’t open yet. We left Niagara Falls around 9:40 a.m. for home.

Around 10:20, we ate at a gas station in New York, and right after that, we hit the road again.

Once again, there were hills, mountains, fields and windmills, and we passed the lake we had seen on the way up a few days before. By 12:47 p.m., we were in Pennsylvania, and by 2:48, we saw the Welcome to Harrisburg sign. We arrived in Summerdale around 3:15 p.m.

Overall, it was a great trip! We got to volunteer at the food bank, and enjoy the diversity of the Kensington neighborhood of Toronto.

Come and join this program next year!


 

For information on the alternative term-break trip, contact Romeo Azondekon.

To comment on a story or to suggest a story idea, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Yuliani Sutedjo is vice president of The Knightly News Media Club @ Central Penn College.

She is also Central Penn College Student Government Association president.

Edited by club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

 

Leave a Comment

Filed under Alumni News, Central Penn College in the Community, On Campus Happenings

A group of gallant Knights explores Toronto while lending a helping hand

Four-day odyssey is a learning and living

experience of culture and service

Part one of two.

Story and photos

By Yuliani Sutedjo

Knightly News Reporter

Day 1

TORONTO – Hi, everyone. Follow me in my story on the four-day journey I took with other students and some staff to Canada in April.

Eight Central Penn students, all from the Summerdale campus except one from the Lancaster center, rendezvoused at the college on a day in early April, at 6 a.m., for the annual alternative term-break trip run by the diversity office, to provide community service— in Toronto. Two Central Penn staff members also went on the trip.

It was windy and chilly, and not fully light.

By 6:15 a.m., we hit the road to Canada.

On the way up Interstate 81 through Pennsylvania and into New York state – up, up, up toward Niagara Falls, and Canada – we passed towns and cities, mountains, farms, rivers, lakes and windmills.

We drove on and on, in two cars.

After about 300 miles, we arrived at the Canadian border at about 11:37 a.m.

When we reached the border crossing, the Canadian border guard at the gate asked Megan Cline, Central Penn counselor, some questions such as, where we were from, what we would be doing in Canada, and where we would stay and where we would go while in Canada. The officer’s tone was intense; she seemed like a drill sergeant.

Once through the grilling, and the gate, it took another hour and a half to arrive at the College Backpackers Hostel, in Toronto’s Kensington neighborhood.At 1:30 p.m., we got our room, had a quick nap for an hour, and then came back to meet up around 2:45 to have lunch at the Toronto Eaton Centre mall.

View from hostel window

This is the view from my hostel room window.

Some of us ate Chinese food and others had Indian food, while still others had food from Tim Hortons, a fast-food bistro. After a quick lunch, we explored the mall. The mall has a UNIQLo clothing store, among many others. I looked for some items, and then went to hunt a bubble tea at a place called Chatime. We went back to the hostel around 6.

The day was done. Some of us decided to rest or go to sleep, and some of us decided to watch a movie with Romeo Azondekon, Central Penn’s chief diversity officer. I decided to go to bed around 10 p.m., and skip the movie.

 

Day 2

It was like the day before when we left Pennsylvania – cloudy, windy and raining, but we set out for our destination. The group of us arrived at the North York Harvest Food Bank around 9:50 a.m. We were greeted by Leslie Venturainol and Kadian Clarke. In the food bank, we had the chance to volunteer. Our task was to look for a good can of food, make sure the food was not expired and then to put it in the right storage box. We were proud to volunteer and feed 100 families.

At the North York Harvest Food Bank with Kadian Clarke and Leslie Venturainol.

At the North York Harvest Food Bank with Kadian Clarke and Leslie Venturainol.

The day wasn’t over then, though. We were very hungry and decided to buy lunch at the Eaton Centre, around 1 p.m. Right after lunch, Belinda Rivera, Jasmine Harvey, Danielle Gilbert, Sovit Adhikari, Paul Jones, and Romeo went to the Casa Loma landmark and museum. Megan, and Linda Brown, Johnny McGee, Tiyana Butler and I went back to the hostel. Casa Loma is beautiful. It looks partly like an old castle. My favorite part is the top tower. I was there on another trip.

Around 5 p.m., the group went back to the hostel. An hour late, Romeo, Belinda, Paul and I went to a nearby supermarket to shop for dinner. We came back around 6:45 and started to cook. We had chicken, rice, soup beans, green beans and boiled potatoes.

Sovit Adhikari, Jasmine Harvey, Tiyana Butler, Linda Brown, Paul Jones and Danielle Gilbert make supper at the hostel.

Sovit Adhikari (background, left), Jasmine Harvey, Tiyana Butler, Linda Brown, Paul Jones and Danielle Gilbert make supper at the hostel.

During dinner, we talked about who our favorite actor and our favorite singer is, and discussed what we liked about Central Penn College. Right after dinner, Belinda, Danielle, Johnny, Jasmine, Linda and Tiyana decided to go to the Ripley Aquarium. The aquarium closed at 11 p.m., so they wanted to get going.

When they were finished touring the aquarium, the students were waiting to get picked up around 11 p.m. Meanwhile, I stayed at the hostel to get some rest. All of a sudden, my phone vibrated. It was a text from Central Penn student Mbuyi “Steve-O” Osango, who had already been in Toronto. Steve-O came to visit, and spent two and a half hours at the hostel. During his visit, around 11:15, Tiyana called Steve-O so she could talk to me, because she couldn’t reach me – my phone was out of data.

“Is Romeo on his way?” she asked me.

“I guess so,” I said.

Because I wasn’t sure if Romeo was on his way to pick the group up at the aquarium, and my phone was no use, I went to the guys’ room, where Romeo was staying for the trip, to confirm that he was on his way to pick the students up.

“Yes,” they said.

Another phone call came in around 11:25. Romeo still wasn’t there, and it was cold. That’s when Megan decided to pick the group up.

Some people, including me, didn’t have data, so we were depending on the Wi-Fi.

As Megan went to pick them up, I kept in touch with everyone in the group chat and Steve-O decided to get some food at Subway. Fifteen minutes later, Romeo came in with Steve-O, whom he met outside the hostel, where he had been waiting for the call to pick the group up.

It turned out there were some miscommunication and technology issues. Eventually, though, we all settled down, and things were cleared up.


Editor’s note: Watch for the next installment of this story!


To comment on a story or to suggest a story idea, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Yuliani Sutedjo is vice president of The Knightly News Media Club @ Central Penn College.

She is also Central Penn College Student Government Association president.

Edited by club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

1 Comment

Filed under Alumni News, Central Penn College in the Community, On Campus Happenings

Inaugural internship fair a success

Strong company attendance

raises chances of student success

 

By Sherri Long

Knightly News Reporter

Approximately 90 Central Penn students networked with representatives of business and nonprofit organizations at the inaugural Internship Fair at Central Penn College on July 25.

Twenty-nine organizations participated.

 

Businesses, nonprofits and the state

Kristin Fike, internship coordinator at Central Penn, believed the event was a success and a unique opportunity for students.

“Because we did not charge companies to attend the event, this opened the opportunity for nonprofits and state organizations, who normally can’t participate in job fairs due to fees,” Fike said.

 

A win-win situation

Corporate  communications students Kathleen Tarr, Ian Kemmerer and Michael Ademola meet with Mark Anderson, manager, training and hiring, reservations, at Hershey Entertainment & Resorts during the Internship Fair. Photo by Sarayuth Pinthong.

Corporate communications students Kathleen Tarr, Ian Kemmerer and Michael Ademola meet with Mark Anderson, manager, training and hiring, reservations, at Hershey Entertainment & Resorts during the Internship Fair.                            Photo by Sarayuth Pinthong.

 

Students, who ranged from first-year to seniors, benefited from the internship fair by being able to connect and share their resumes with several organizations at one convenient location.

The organizations benefit by connecting with a wide range of students and creating more awareness about their business or cause.

Mark Anderson, manager, training and hiring-reservations at Hershey Entertainment & Resorts, said, “Whenever and wherever we have the opportunity to be out in the public, we are there.”

 

Stacks of resumes

Anderson said he writes notes on the resumes he receives at internship and job fairs. Then, he turns those resumes over to Ryan Epler, senior recruiter at Hershey Entertainment & Resorts.

“Our resumes go to our senior recruiter, Ryan. I take notes, here, on specific departments they are interested in, and then Ryan will follow up with everyone.”

Epler follows up with candidates to encourage them to apply for current positions or let them know about upcoming opportunities.

Perrise Hatcher, recruiter, Pennsylvania Liquor Control Board, Bureau of Human Resources, shared what she does with the resumes collected at job and internship fairs.

“Once a position opens, we look through our stack of resumes to look for the best candidates,” Hatcher said.

 

Yes, LinkedIn profiles DO matter

Myneca Ojo, director of the office of diversity and inclusion at the Pennsylvania Turnpike Commission, spoke about the importance of making connections and networking with people and businesses, “even if they aren’t offering exactly what you are looking for at the moment.”

“I ask people if they are on LinkedIn and if they say no, I tell them, ‘Well, then, get on LinkedIn,’” said Ojo.

She explained that many employers and HR professionals share job and internship opportunities, from all departments, on LinkedIn.

Mark Anderson shared that after finding a potential candidate from resumes received, the next step is to look over that candidate’s LinkedIn profile.

“You can get so much more information on LinkedIn than just a resume.”

 

Practice, research, connect

No matter where a student is in her college career, attending internship and job fairs, and networking events should be on a student’s “must-do” list. Several organization representatives said they would be happy to look over a student’s resume and provide feedback.

By starting to network with companies as a freshman, students can build a relationship with recruiters that can lead to internships or jobs when the student is ready to graduate.

Central Penn’s Career Services provides several opportunities for students, and alumni, to network. Upcoming events include the Networking Reception, Aug. 31, 11 a.m. – 1 p.m., and the Fall Job and Internship Fair, Nov. 1, 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Visit centralpenn.edu/careerservices for more information and follow their Facebook page for registration details.


Sherri Long is president of the media club.

Edited by club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

To comment on this story, or to suggest a story, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Alumni News, Central Penn College in the Community, On Campus Happenings

New Club Fair Format Seems Succcesful

Feedback will help shape future fairs

Story and photos

By Michael Lear-Olimpi

Knightly News Co-Adviser and Editor

What was old was new – but not again, because this was a first – when the quarterly club fair was held in the evening, for two hours, on the first floor of ATEC, on July 12.

DSCN1788

Athletic Director Dave Baker talks to students at the women’s soccer team table.

From 4 to 6 p.m., about 100 students, and faculty, staff and administrators dropped by the lobby in the first floor of ATEC (the Advanced Technology Education Center), between the Knight & Day Cafe and the Conference Center at Central Penn College, and in the conference center hallway, to get information on student clubs.

“We’ll see how it goes,” Activities Director Adrienne Thoman said of the late-afternoon/early-evening fair. “We’re trying this to offer more students the chance to attend, now that Common Hour isn’t Common Hour anymore.”

The club fair has usually been held from noon or so until about 1 p.m., but that is the same time Common Hour, an open presentation by a guest or Central Penn speaker, occurs. Many students, faculty and staff attend Common Hour. Faculty often offer their classes extra credit for attending Common Hour, making an assignment of writing a report or paper about the presentation.

“This way, I hope more continuing-ed(ucation) students can come, and students who can’t make it to the fairs held earlier in the day,” Thoman explained.

Strong showing

DSCN1804

Craig Daube, accounting, tells homeland security major Jessie Porter about the Equal Club.

Sixteen clubs, and two organizations – the Pennsylvania State Employee Credit Union (PSECU) and the women’s soccer team – set tables up. Club representatives and advisers told fair-goers about what the clubs do, and solicited memberships. Sign-up sheets were on the tables, along with displays of what the clubs do.

PSECU, a longtime partner of Central Penn that supports student and other college functions, and maintains a year-round presence in ATEC to offer students and employees information on banking services, did that at the club fair.

Thoman also changed this term’s club-fair menu. Usually, pizza – though sometimes long sandwiches cut into portion-sized sections – chips or other snack food, and soda or water, have been available for free to students who fill a “passport,” a small sheet of paper, with signatures of club members or advisers when they visit a club booth.

When the passport was filled, students got food and drink, though no one at a fair ever was denied refreshment, even if a passport wasn’t filled with signatures or other proof a student had visited all club tables.

This year, Knight & Day Cafe workers exchanged a heaping helping of chicken wings, with as many french fries as students desired, or fish fillets (and wings), and a drink, for a ticket fairgoers got from Thoman after they surrendered their club-fair passports to her.

“They’re great,” a student said as she munched a huge spicy red sauce-slathered wing on her way out to the sunbaked patio.

High expectations

DSCN1796

Daylin Davis, left, corporate communcation, gets information about the Central Penn Players from club President Morgan Littleford, corporate communication. Club Vice President Ashanti Conover, criminal justice administration, center, was waiting to fill Davis in with more club doings.

Members of the Central Penn Players drama club were perky about the fair.

“We’ve had a lot of people stop by,” club president and corporate communications major Morgan Littleford said. “Not many have signed up, but it’s only 5 o’clock.”

More students stopped by during the fair and some did sign up.

DSCN1790

Knight Writers President Danielle Payton, legal studies and Vice President Mercedes Reddick at the Knight Writers table.

At the Knight Writers creative-writing club table, President Danielle Payton, legal studies, and Vice President Mercedes Reddick, business administration, were busy telling stoppers-by about the club.

“Fourteen people signed up, and seven came to the (club) meeting,”  adviser Prof. Maria Thiaw said.

 

 

The revived Hispanic American Student Association (HASA) table was decked out in the flag of Cuba and the flag of Puerto Rico (this link is the U.S. government portal to Puerto Rico’s page; to connect to the Puerto Rican government’s site, in Spanish – which Google will translate to English – click here).

“We’re just starting again,” HASA President Eliz Milanes, a criminal justice administration major, said. “People have shown interest. We are a club for all Latino students, but anyone can join.”

Milanes and club Vice President Amor Duran, communication, was also at the table.

DSCN1808

HASA President Eliz Milanes at the club’s table.

A college-family affair

Faculty, besides club advisers, also came to the fair, as did academic administrators.

Vice President of Academic Affairs and Provost Dr. Linda Fedrizzi-Williams made the rounds.

“I’m stopping at all the tables,” Fedrizzi-Williams said at the Knightly News Media Club table. “I’m an honorary member (of the media club).”

Fedrizzi-Williams holds a bachelor’s degree in communication and a master’s degree in organizational communication, and has taught communication.

Athletics Director Dave Baker was on hand, as was Dr. Melissa Wehler, dean of the School of Humanities and Sciences, and others.

Thoman distributed an email survey to club attendees and advisers for input on the new club time and location. Results are pending.

Information about Central Penn clubs and activities is available here.


Prof. Lear-Olimpi is co-adviser of the Knightly News Media Club.

To comment on this story or to suggest a story, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Leave a Comment

Filed under On Campus Happenings

Campus Bridge is a Link to the Future, and to the Past

By Destani Matthews

Knightly News Reporter

Central Penn College has been home to the 148-year-old Henszey’s Wrought Iron Bridge, a historic touch to the campus scenery, for over a decade.

This bridge has been one of the main attractions for not only prospective students, but the school’s surrounding community. The school’s former tagline that interweaved with having the historical piece is “Your Bridge to Success,” as well as making the school logo the outline of the bridge.

Henszey’s Wrought Iron Bridge is one of the historic treasurers on Central Penn's campus.

Henszey’s Wrought Iron Bridge is one of the historic treasures on Central Penn’s campus. Photo by Michael Lear-Olimpi

Former Central Penn College President Todd A. Milano bid on the bridge for just $22 from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; he was the only bidder. Before giving bridges away, the state first seeks to improve and reuse its historic bridges.

“If it can be rehabilitated, we’ll rehabilitate it – that’s our preference, especially from a historic preservation perspective,” Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) spokesperson Kara Russell told structuremag.com.

According to historicbridges.org, the bridge is 92 feet long, 17 feet wide and 9 feet high. Patented by Joseph G. Henszey in 1869, and built by the Continental Bridge Co. of Philadelphia, the shape of the wrought iron (a tough, pliable form of metal made for forging instead of casting) bridge is both bowstring (the braided steel cable) and arch.

The main purpose of the bridge was to carry Main Street traffic over Trout Creek in Slatington, Lehigh County. It functioned for nearly 80 years, carrying cars and milk trucks – loads heavier than the bridge was meant to hold.

It was later replaced by another bridge and moved to Wanamakers, also in Lehigh County, where it served to carry lighter traffic until the bridge was again moved to Greiner Industries in Mount Joy, Lancaster County, for restoration.

On Jan. 16, 2001, the Pennsylvania Department of General Services informed Central Penn College the school held the winning bid on the bridge. The historic bridge was set up at the college on May 6, 2002. Part of the agreement of buying any of the bridges specifies that they must be restored to meet Pennsylvania’s Secretary of the Interior’s standards.

According to The Washington Post, it’s important having the Henszey’s Bridge on Central Penn’s campus, for historical purposes.

“Historically, truss bridges were made to be moved, so it’s still in keeping with their historic nature to move them,” Russell told the Post.

The bridge’s influence on the spirit of Central Penn continues through appearances in the background of numerous college photos and videos, and the bridge continues to offer a beautiful and functional connection on campus, a unique landmark that no other place in the country has.


To comment on this story or to suggest a story, contact the KnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Edited by media club coadviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

Leave a Comment

Filed under Central Penn College in the Community, On Campus Happenings

Don’t Stress Out!

Staff and students of Central Penn enjoy seven minutes of free massage therapy to relieve midterm blues

By Sarayuth Pinthong and Fontaine McClure

Knightly News Reporters

There’s a strange pressure building on your shoulders and there’s just not enough time to think, much less continue studying for that exam. You feel like you’re about to explode with information overload.

Ugh! You say: “I just can’t stand it!

Calm down, take a breath and try to relax.

That’s what students, faculty and staff members did during free chair massages offered in the Advanced Technology Education Center during the midterm, and briefly during finals preparation.

Campus counselors Megan Cline and Candace Johnson arranged for Ian Thomas, a licensed massage therapy with The Roots of Health Central Pennsylvania Center for CranioSacral Health & Therapeutic Massage, in Susquehanna Township.

A chair massage is one in which a person sits in a chair, usually face-down, so a massage therapist can work on the person’s neck, shoulders and back.

The massages offered anyone who signed up an option to destress and relax from the tensions of projects, exams or activities of the day during the midterm.

“Usually three times a week during week 5 or 6 is when I try to offer the massage therapy,” Cline said. “Then again at week 10. That’s usually the time when I notice the most stress (in students) because students may have a lot of tests, or projects due.”

Some students may not recognize that they have built up stress or may not have an outlet to release stress. A person may be on edge and react quickly to things that normally wouldn’t bother him or her if the person weren’t stressed out, according to Cline.

Students speak about stress

“I worry about grades, work, scheduling conflicts and life outside of campus and work,” Angel Carrion, business management and human resources student, said. “Everything just piles up.”

Cline says studies back up the benefits of massage.

“Research shows that massage therapy is stress and anxiety reducing,” she explained. “That’s the number one reason I have this as an event for students.”

Along with massage therapy, there are other ways to manage stress.

“A student has to figure out what is relaxing to them,” Cline said. “It’s different for everyone. It’s finding out what those coping skills are for you.”

Ian Thomas, the licensed massage therapist from The Roots of Health, who volunteered to provide the chair massages, said.

“I think that it’s really helpful,” he said. ”There are definitely some stressors here and sometimes self-care takes a backseat.”

Listening to music, going to the gym and taking naps are some coping skills that could help to relieve stress, according to Cline.

Any student experiencing stress needs to find someone or something to use as a positive outlet.  Holding stress inside could be a negative and dangerous situation for a person. Also, stress released the wrong way at the wrong time can cause problems – an increase stress, in the long run.

“For anyone that doesn’t really use stress management or have any strategy to cope with stress, you notice that they may not be doing well in class,” Cline said. “It can be a snowball effect to not do well in school. We’re offering them an opportunity to help relieve that stress and focus better.”

If you are experiencing stress or want more information about stress and how to deal with it, contact Cline at 717-728-2416 or megancline@centralpenn.edu or councelor@centralpenn.edu


To comment on this story or to suggest a story, contact the KnghtlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

 

 

 

Leave a Comment

Filed under Central Penn College in the Community, On Campus Happenings