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Students seek opportunities at job fair

About 20 organizations showed

what they have to offer

 

By Kathleen Tarr and Michael Ademola

Knightly News Reporters

On Nov. 1, representatives of several companies and businesses visited Central Penn for the quarterly job fair to offer interesting insight, information and opportunities for those nearing graduation in search of a job or an internship opportunity.

Among the 20 or so different businesses with table/booths inside Central Penn’s Conference Center were representatives who could appeal to any student’s major.

About 30 students attended, with most present from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m.

Some of the businesses offered opportunities to multiple majors. Some offered different jobs to a single major, and the rest had only one job or internship opportunity for a single major.

Central Penn College Career Services Director Steve Hassinger and Associate Director Rubina Azizdin organized the event to give students the opportunity to bridge the gap between their collegiate and professional careers.

This wasn’t the first job fair the college has offered, and it definitely won’t be the last. If you’re a student who missed out on the opportunity to build relationships with potential employers, make sure you’re at the next job fair!


To comment on this story or to suggest one, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Edited by club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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Breaking News: Littleford wins SGA presidency

Candidates for the other three offices were unopposed

By Brian Christiana

Knightly News Reporter

The Student Government Association (SGA) last week had its 2018 elections. The student body decided who they wanted to see them represent their voice.

Morgan Littleford, Central Penn's SGA president-elect. She will assume office, with the new vice president, secretary and online delegate, at the end of the fall term. Photo courtesy Central Penn SGA

Morgan Littleford, Central Penn’s SGA president-elect. She will assume office, with the new vice president, secretary and online delegate, at the end of the fall term. Photo courtesy Central Penn SGA

The students voted for president, vice president, secretary and online delegate.

The president nominees were Morgan Littleford and Johnathan Noss.

The other three positions were for only a single contestant each.

Vice president was Isaiah Scott, secretary was Christine Donaghy and online delegate was Angelina Stillman.

Littleford and Noss were looking to replace 2017 President Yuliani Sutedjo. Sutedjo had done many great activities during the 2017 school year. She brought many great ideas, and was really involved on and off campus. She will be dearly missed at the school, and we all appreciate the service she has done.

 SGA speech panel

The students had an opportunity to meet the candidates on Nov. 7 in the Capital BlueCross Theatre. The candidates were trying to persuade the audience about why they deserve votes.

Littleford brought up how she has a lot of experience with being the 2017 vice president and being involved in SGA since she has been on campus.

Noss talked about how he has been devoted and committed to many organizations, which include: Christian church groups, grocery store manager and construction.

They both talked about how they are for the on and off campus students, and how the candidates want to make the school better.

“I think the SGA kickoff went exceptionally well,” Littleford said. “Each candidate articulated what they can do for the campus. This school would be lucky to have any of us represent them.”

Noss thought that the panel was a very good experience for not just the students, but for the candidates as well.

Noss said, “We all have unique stories of successes and failures, and for me, it was inspiring to hear those stories being told today.”

They both said that they are committed to work with future and current faculty, and they want to find a way to make the students happier with the cafeteria.

“One of the main things I would do as president is to make sure the quality of food is better in the Knight & Day Café,” said Littleford.

Littleford added that she will work closely with Sutedjo to make sure she picks up where the outgoing president left off.

Results

The voting started on Nov. 7, and ended on Nov. 10, at midnight.

Littleford defeated Noss to become president.

Scott, Donaghy and Stillman each won the positions they ran for – vice president, secretary and online delegate.

According to SGA adviser Adrienne Thoman, Littleford got 63 percent of 43 votes cast for president, for a total of 27, leaving 16 for Noss.

Scott received 41, and Donaghy and Stillman each received 42 votes.

Thoman said the candidates will have a formal inauguration by the end of the term, and assume office then.


To comment on this story or to suggest one, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.  Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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Knights finally return to the court

First game is tonight in York

By Brian Christiana, Paul Jones and Ian Kemmerer

Knightly News Reporters

The Central Penn basketball teams will have their opening games tonight at Penn State York, with the women starting at 6 and the men at 8.

The men’s team started playing on Oct. 27 when they traveled to Pikesville, Ky., to compete in the University of Pikesville Tip-Off Tournament.

The Knights are coming off a very successful season in which they finished 25-9 and had a long United States Collegiate Athletic Association (USCAA) tournament.

The Knights, however, have lost many key players due to graduation. The players include Tyree Tucker (21.4 points per game), Tyrie Orosco (20.3) and Rafeeq Bush (9.5).

The Knights have many key players returning to the team this season. The Knights are excited to have Noah Baylor, Daylin Davis, Randy Dupont, and Joel Zola return to the floor. They are depending on these guys to help lead the team to another tournament appearance.

The team has brought in many first-year players who could help. The team welcomed Justin Kellman (Reading, Penn.), Juwan Gooding (Boston, Mass.), John Blanc (Hillside, N.J.) and Ryan Lawrence (Lakewood, N.J.).

Facing a tough lineup

The Knights will be going up against some heavy NCAA Division I competition this season. They will be traveling to the University of Maryland Baltimore County on Nov. 16, Winthrop University on the 18th, Howard University on the 20th, University of Buffalo on Dec. 9 and Cornell University on Jan. 5.

“I think we have a hungry group of guys this season – the chemistry we have is really helping us,” Zola said.

He also said that the main goal for this season is to bring Central Penn its first-ever USCAA championship.

“The coaching staff has really done a great job to prepare us and push us really hard,” said the sophomore. “We have a new group that are always willing to work all year-round.”

First-year player Ryan Lawrence was eager to start the season, too.

“I’m feeling pretty good,” Lawrence said. “We have a new coaching staff that will help with our new players. The new faces around here will help bring a new culture to the team.”

John Blanc said some good things as well.

“The coaching staff is doing an excellent job of making sure we are practicing and playing well,” he said. “Even when Coach Archer isn’t there, the assistants are really stepping up.”

Blanc also said the team’s energy could lead to a championship.

An interesting off season

In the summer, some current and former Knights got to show their own and see others’ talents at the summer league games played on the basketball courts behind Kathi Hall. The summer league gave players Daylin Davis and Zola a good look at who is going to be coming to the Knights’ program.

Head Coach David Archer is also excited to see the team tip off. He talked about how the team still has the same standards even with one senior. He wants his players to step up, so they can fulfill their goal of winning a championship.

“The team will continue to work hard in the classroom, on the court, and in the community,” Archer said.

He then said: “We are not just building basketball players, but the future leaders of tomorrow.”

 Not many home games

The Knights have only eight home games in Enola this season, so make sure you get a chance to see them play. The Knights play home games at East Pennsboro High School.

The first home game is on Nov. 17, when they go against Penn State Lehigh.

Here’s the schedule.

To comment on this story or to suggest one, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.


Edited by Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi, Knightly News co-adviser.

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Media Club fall soup sale returns

Popular fundraiser will liven your lunch.

Order now!

By Megan Smith

Knightly News Reporter

Have you been feeling cold lately?

Warm up with the Knightly News Media Club!

The Fall Annual Soup Sale fundraiser supporting the Knightly New Media Club is returning to Central Penn College on Thursday, from 11 a.m. – 1 p.m.

The soup sale will be held near The Capital BlueCross Theatre, in The Underground.

In addition, delivery will be available to any location on campus during the sale.

The club is offering, vegan vegetable, chicken noodle and Italian wedding soup for $3, and Maryland crab soup for $4.

The soup sale will be run by the club’s members, including the club’s co-advisers, professors Paul Miller and Michael Lear-Olimpi.

Pre-orders have already started, so order your soup now by contacting Prof. Miller

Please pre-order your soup by Wednesday at noon, and let Miller know what type(s) of soup, where it should be delivered to and the time you wish the soup to be delivered.

Payment for the soup is not required until Nov. 2 when it gets delivered to you.

Soup Sale


To comment on this story or to suggest a story, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.

Edited by Knightly New Co-Adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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New club fair format scores again!

The change has brought more students to the event – with no classes missed.

 By Michael Lear-Olimpi

Knightly News Co-adviser and Editor

At least 100 students attended the second club fair that has been held at the beginning of a term, from 4 to 6 p.m. on Wednesday, in ATEC. About 15 clubs set up tables with information on mission and activities.

“I think it’s working better,” Activities Director Adrienne Thoman said about halfway through the fair. “I printed 100 passports, and they’re gone.”

Students get the paper passports stamped at each club table they visit. A full passport entitled its holder to a ticket, which was traded for wings with hot, Buffalo or Thai sauce, and french fries, in the Knight & Day Café.

In the summer, Thoman moved the club fair from noon to 1 p.m. on the first Wednesday of a term to 4 to 6 p.m. on the first Wednesday in a term to allow more students – commuter, continuing-education and on-campus – to attend, because no classes are held then.

Prior to the change, some students – even club advisers – couldn’t attend the fair because they were in class. Even though some professors took or sent their classes to the noon club fairs, sometimes for class credit, not every professor did so, with some noon classes requiring the in-room time on club-fair day.

“We’ve had sign-ups, and we’ve had a lot of students stop by,” Britany Raber, president of the PTA Club, said around 5 p.m. “We’re different from some clubs, because members must be PTA majors.”

Raber agreed that more students can attend club fairs in the late afternoon and early evening.

Club Vice President Phalen Hazel and member Timothy Weaver staffed the table with Raber.

Officers and members of other clubs also saw brisk traffic.

“Yes, we’ve had people sign up,” Ashanti Conover, a member of the Central Penn Players theater club, said as she stood by the club’s table, which was topped with a dramatic poster. “They want to express themselves.”

Officers of Central Penn’s newest club, the Garden Club, were expecting a growth spurt.

“The club formed a little over two weeks ago, right before the term break,” President Carolyn Rodriquez said. “We’re going strong. People have joined today. We’re going to teach people about gardening, and help them grow plants. We’ll also talk about bees, composting, plants native to North America – different aspects of gardening.”

Interest in the gardening club wasn’t confined to students. Matthew Vickless, dean of the School of Professional Studies, joined, as did some faculty members.

Knight & Day Café staff said they prepared about 1,500 wings and “a lot of french fries.”


To comment on this story, or to suggest one, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.

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Thank you, Dr. Scolforo

Editor’s note: The following is an editorial by Student Government President Yuliani Sutedjo. The opinion is hers, and does not necessarily reflect the opinions of The Knightly News or its staff, and is not an endorsement. Sutedjo is also vice president of The Knightly News.

By Yuliani Sutedjo

Karen M. Scolforo, the ninth president of Central Penn College, resigned on Sept. 15.

She said in several communications to faculty, staff and students that she decided to resign because she needed to live closer to her mother, who is ailing.

“I made the decision to apply with the goal of moving closer to my ailing mother, and to provide some support for my sister, who serves as her sole care provider,” Scolforo said in Central Station email on Sept. 4.

Scolforo will become president of Castleton University, in Vermont, in early December.

During Scolforo’s tenure, from 2013, she accomplished many things.

Below are a few of those accomplishments listed on her curriculum vitae (CV):

  • She built The Underground, which provides students the ability to relax and have some fun. The building consists of the Capital BlueCross Theatre, offices, a gym, the Student Government Association office, a dance studio and the student lounge.
  • She also redesigned the new health science building, called the Donald B. and Dorothy L. Stabler Health Sciences Building.
  • Expanded academic programs, including four new medical bachelor degrees and three graduate-level options.
  • Established the Center for Global Education and Cultural Inclusion.
  • Increased underrepresented populations by 30 percent in staff and faculty.
  • Installation of a gender-neutral restroom.

Besides these achievements, she received many awards for being involved in the community. Below are some of them listed on her (CV):

  • Century Link Business Woman of the Year, 2017.
  • YWCA Woman of Excellence, 2017.
  • Central Penn Business Journal Executive Leadership Team (president and cabinet) nominee, 2016.
  • Women’s Conference Care to Share, 2017.
  • Central Penn Business Journal Woman of Influence, 2016.
  • Carlisle Chamber of Commerce Business Woman of the Year nominee, 2015, 2016, 2017.
  • West Shore Chamber of Commerce Prestigious Visionary Luminary, 2015.
  • U.S. Women’s Chamber of Commerce, Women Who Thrive, 2015.

As the president of the Student Government Association, I want to thank you for all the work you did.

Your accomplishments and awards have been helpful for our students and made Central Penn College grow bigger with the many connections you made.

Thank you for making The Underground a reality. Students get to experience the world of theater, are able to exercise and have a place to hang out.

The time you took to have monthly meetings with the Student Government Association was helpful for us to allow direct communication with you about student concerns.

Thank you for taking time to support the events that happened on campus, such as coming to many basketball home games and some away games, coming to see the student-created play and some other plays held at the Capital BlueCross Theatre, coming to some of the poetry contests in The Underground, and other events.

I wish you all the best at Castleton University, and reuniting with your mom and sister.


To comment on this story, or to suggest one, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.

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Media club dedicates podcast studio to beloved deceased member

The people who never knew Nasir Harris learned why he was special.

Those who knew him remembered, smiled and cried.

Story and Photos

By Michael Lear-Olimpi

Co-adviser, Knightly News

About 40 people attended the dedication of the Knightly News Media Club podcast studio in the Boyer House to the late Nasir Harris on Thursday.

Nine members of Harris’ family, media club members, college administrators, faculty, staff and some students were on hand from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. to view a memorial video of Nasir that included interviews with his mother and father, Eugene and Naomi Harris, his siblings, and Central Penn personnel who knew him. (See embedded video below.)

Harris, 28, a corporate communications major and a founding member of the Knightly News Media Club podcast studio, died June 14 after a brief illness. He was on a short break from school, but was preparing to return to Central Penn for the summer or fall term when he died at home.

“We miss him, but he will always be here with us, in our memories and in our hearts,” podcast studio manager and media club co-adviser Prof. Paul Miller told Eugene Harris.

Media Club President Sherri Long, right, officially dedicates the Nasir Harris Podcast Studio of The Knightly News Media Club at Central Penn College.

Media Club President Sherri Long, right, officially dedicates the Nasir Harris Podcast Studio of The Knightly News Media Club at Central Penn College.

Miller was speaking to Mr. Harris in a front room of the Boyer House, where a video of Nasir’s family and Central Penn faculty who knew him, presented reminiscences on a large-screen television screen of Nasir. The video, about half an hour long, played several times. Besides watching the tribute, people also toured the podcast studio. Several people left the video-tribute viewing room daubing tears.

“We all were very fond of Nasir,” Melissa Wehler, dean of the School of Humanities and Sciences, told Naomi Harris. “He will always be remembered.”

Nasir had been the student worker in Bollinger 46, where Wehler’s office was before it moved to the Advanced Technology Education Center (ATEC).

Matthew Vickless, dean of the School of Professional Studies and interim dean of the School of Business, also shared some memories of Nasir with his parents.

Linda Fedrizzi-Williams, Central Penn College co-president, provost and vice president of academic affairs, told Nasir’s parents she hadn’t had the honor of knowing Nasir, but had heard about his wonderfully positive attitude, helpfulness and friendliness, and expressed condolences and regret at the loss of a member of the college community as well-loved as Nasir.

“This is all very touching, and moving,” Eugene Harris said, surveying the people meeting and greeting one another in the Boyer House as they ate a light lunch. “Thank you, so much.”

The Harris family.

The Harris family.

Mrs. Harris was similarly moved.

“This is a wonderful opportunity to meet his ‘other’ family,” Mrs. Harris said of the event. “We knew he was very involved in the media club, but we never met any of his Central Penn family.”

Club President Sherri Long officially dedicated the podcast studio, on the second floor of Boyer House and which began operating in the early winter, to Nasir at about 12:15 p.m. on the historic building’s south lawn, where Central Penn facilities workers had set up tables and chairs for the occasion, and people continued their lunch.

Long’s comments were brief.

“We’re here to dedicate the Nasir Harris Podcast Studio,” Long, a corporate communications major, said as she held aloft the small, red wooden plaque with a black metal plate bearing Nasir’s name.

Long presented the family with the plaque, and a large photo of the family that people attending the studio dedication had signed on the back, and copies of the tribute video, made by club secretary Sarayuth Pinthong. Each media club member, co-advisers Miller and Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi, and some other Central Penn personnel received a copy of the video, which Pinthong made during a Saturday visit to the Harrises’ home in Harrisburg. Other media club members helped.

School of Humanities and Sciences Dean Melissa Wehler makes some comments at the dedication.

School of Humanities and Sciences Dean Melissa Wehler makes some comments at the dedication.

Pinthong, the club’s videographer who spent about 20 years as a photographer with the U.S. Air Force and who maintains his own photography and videography business, made the video with his equipment, on his time. The club covered the cost of producing the DVDs that were distributed.

Long, Miller, Lear-Olimpi and other club members, and Central Penn faculty and staff in attendance, gathered after the dedication for photos.

Prior to the dedication, attendees milled about inside the Boyer House, meeting and speaking with one another, and remembering Nasir.

“This is a great turnout, and an indication of how many people cared so much for this young man,” Richard Varmecky, Central Penn interim co-president and chief financial officer, said.

Professors Miller and Lear-Olimpi talked with the Harrises about Nasir’s love of radio, and his crucial role in making the podcast studio a reality.

“I remember him saying once, ‘We’re not doing radio? We can do podcasts – let’s do it,’” Lear-Olimpi told Mr. and Mrs. Harris, and two of his sisters. “He was passionate about it, and we were lucky to have him, for many reasons.”

Harris had done over-the-air radio at Shippensburg University before coming to Central Penn. He was a popular deejay at Ship, well known for his vast knowledge of and deep appreciation for music, and for his keen sense of humor. He brought those qualities, and more, to Central Penn, person after person said.

“Big Nas,” as Nasir’s family and friends called him, loved media – especially radio, and “all things voice,” club president Long said. “I’m sure he’s smiling down on us,” Long told the crowd assembled for the studio dedication.

Media Club members Ian Kemmerer and Kathleen Tarr show Nasir's nephew, Kezra Lee, 9, the studio named in honor and memory of his uncle.

Media Club members Ian Kemmerer and Kathleen Tarr show Nasir’s nephew, Kezra Lee, 9, the studio named in honor and memory of his uncle.

The media club covered all costs for food, drink, the dedication plaque, and video production. The club owns the podcast equipment in the studio.

In her comments during the dedication, Long thanked club members, the advisers and the college for support of the club’s mission and work, and for attending the ceremony Thursday. She also thanked Facilities Department workers who provided the tables and chairs and set them up, and cleared the assembly area of walnuts that had fallen from trees on the Boyer House lawn that could have made walking difficult.

Besides Nasir’s parents, his sisters Nia, Naeemah, Nicole and, Chenita Lee, attended, along Kezra Lee, 9, and Aniah Lee, 11, and his aunt Betty Jean McEachin.

As people left after the gathering, Mrs. Harris again thanked media club advisers and members for their show of love for Nasir, and respect and concern for the family.

Media Club Vice President Yuliani Sutedjo with the photo of the Harris family presented to them at the dedication.

Media Club Vice President Yuliani Sutedjo with the photo of the Harris family presented to them at the dedication.

“From the time you came to our house just after Nasir passed, and his funeral, until now, with this wonderful remembrance, we have been getting to know his Central Penn family,” she told Lear-Olimpi. “We appreciate it, and you are welcome to visit our home at any time.”

Lear-Olimpi and Miller, along with recent corporate communications graduate and former club member Norman Geary, attended Nasir’s funeral in Philadelphia on June 19, and the college and School of Humanities and Sciences sent flowers.


Michael Lear-Olimpi is co-adviser of The Knightly News Media Club at Central Penn College and editor of Knightly News text content. He was Nasir Harris’ academic adviser.

To comment on this or to suggest a story, email TheKnightlyNews@CentralPenn.Edu.

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President Scolforo resigns

By Yuliani Sutedjo

Knightly News Reporter

Karen M. Scolforo, Central Penn’s ninth president, resigned Friday morning.

Scolforo, who was appointed president in mid-2013, said in a posting on her Facebook page, and later in a special edition of the college’s employee newsletter, Central Station, distributed at 10:20 a.m., “the Board (of directors) has agreed to accept my resignation, and to enact a well-thought out transition plan.”

The announcement was also made Friday in the student email newsletter Student Central.

Scolforo announced in an email to faculty and staff during the first week of September, and also in Central Station, that she had applied for a job as president of a university in New England, for family reasons.

“Many of you have heard me tout a family first mantra, and many have appreciated the support I’ve provided in this regard for all of our Central Penn College family members,” Scolforo wrote in the special edition of Central Station on Friday. “You’ll recall that on September 5th I published a special edition of Central Station to notify you of my decision to apply to a position closer to my family.”

On Friday afternoon, after she had left campus, Scolforo told The Knightly News: “My mother is sick, and I want to be closer to her, and help my family. I miss everyone (at Central Penn).”

Scolforo had applied to Castleton University, part of the Vermont university system, which has about full-time 2,000 students, in Castleton, Vt. She is one of three candidates, according to Castleton’s website.

Carol Wilson Spigner, D.S.W., chair of Central Penn’s board of directors, also told The Knightly News on Friday that Scolforo decided to resign for family reasons.

Scolforo declined Friday to address her candidacy at Castleton, but she said in her early-September message to the Central Penn community that the Castleton board of directors plans to make a decision by Oct. 1.

“Dr. Karen M. Scolforo has resigned from the presidency of Central Penn College for personal reasons,” the board of directors said in a message in Central Station Friday. “Dr. Linda Fedrizzi-Williams, vice president of academic affairs and Richard Varmecky, chief financial officer will serve as interim co-presidents and Carol W. Spigner, D.S.W. will serve as executive director of the college on behalf of the board. This team will provide continuity and stability during this period of transition. The Central Penn College board of directors will begin the process of selecting the next leader immediately.”

Scolforo applied to Castleton in late June. From Sept.11 through 13, she visited Castleton University, and gave a live presentation on the 13th. Some Central Penn College faculty and staff watched the Web broadcast of Scolforo’s presentation.

During her tenure, according to her curriculum vitae, Scolforo achieved many accomplishments for Central Penn, including:

  • Building The Underground, which includes the Capital BlueCross Theatre, a dance studio she sponsored, a weight room, student lounge and student government and other offices
  • Installation of a health-sciences building
  • Appointment of the school’s first diversity officer
  • Appointment of the school’s first Title IX and compliance officers

Yuliani Sutedjo is Student Government Association president and vice president of the Knightly News Media Club.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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No one outshines Rubina Azizdin, 2017 Luminary Award winner

Honor recognizes Central Penn staffer’s stellar accomplishments

 

Rubina Azizdin, winner of the 2017 Shining Star Award from the West Shore Chamber of Commerce’s Luminary Awards. A photoshoot and headshot, pictured above, from Bevrore, photo studio of Mechanicsburg, was one of the perks of being a Luminary Award nominee. Photo courtesy Rubina Azizdin.

Rubina Azizdin, winner of the 2017 Shining Star Award from the West Shore Chamber of Commerce’s Luminary Awards. A photoshoot and headshot, pictured above, from Bevrore, photo studio of Mechanicsburg, was one of the perks of being a Luminary Award nominee. Photo courtesy Rubina Azizdin.

By Sherri Long

Knightly News Reporter

Rubina Azizdin received the 2017 Shining Star Award on Aug. 30 as part of the West Shore Chamber of Commerce’s Luminary Awards, held in the Radisson Harrisburg, Camp Hill.

The Shining Star Award category recognizes a woman in a nonexecutive role who shows “excellence in their work environment and community,” according to the Chamber’s category description.

Azizdin, Central Penn career counselor and part-time faculty member, found out she was nominated in April, but does not know who nominated her.

“They never read or shared my nomination,” she said.

The Chamber learned a lot about the nominees, though. A survey of 40-50 questions about them, their hobbies, family, accomplishments and fun facts was sent to each nominee. The information was used throughout the Luminary Awards campaign and award luncheon.

Perks and fun facts

A perk the nominees enjoyed during the campaign was a photoshoot with Bevrore, a Mechanicsburg photo studio, and each nominee received a headshot photo to use for whatever reason she wants.

The headshots were also used in Luminary Awards advertisements the Chamber placed in online and printed publications, including Susquehanna Style magazine. Social media posts that featured each nominee’s headshot and a fun fact were also used throughout the campaign.

One of Azizdin’s fun facts, according to a Chamber social media post was, “Would want the following written on her tombstone: ‘Please leave me designer purses and shoes instead of flowers – I need to keep up with the latest fashion trends :)’”

“So, I’m known for my shopping addiction,” Azizdin said with a laugh. “I would die without fashion.”

Voting and networking

The winner was elected by a committee through a blind evaluation. Azizdin thought that was a fair process because, “We are a small community and we all know each other, so people didn’t win just because you knew somebody. … [The winner] was kept a secret the entire time.”

The Luminary Awards were created to celebrate business women in the community and “that’s what I’m all about,” said Azizdin.

Nominees met one another during a networking event held prior to the awards luncheon. Azizdin enjoyed being able to mingle with the other nominees.

“With a thing like this, there are so many people and usually you don’t know who you are up against, or you never get to speak to some of the people that you are a part of this process with,” she added. “It was nice to meet all the women up close and personal.”

After meeting the “phenomenal” nominated women, however, Azizdin wasn’t expecting to win. Still, she invited her entire family to come to the award luncheon.

“I said, ‘Look, this is a huge award, a huge event and I want you guys to be there. And, hey, if I don’t win, I still get to see you and then we get to go out and celebrate anyway.’”

Shocking surprise

Azizdin explained the winner-announcement process.

“They called all the nominees up one by one and introduced everybody,” Azizdin said. “But, I don’t even know what they said about me, because I was so nervous! All I remember is something about ice cream. Then we all sat down, and then, they announced my name as the winner.”

Azizdin said it took a few moments to realize she had won. She said she “froze for a bit” while she wondered whether they had really just called her name.

“I was in shock; I’m still in shock,” said Azizdin. “Somehow, I managed to remember to take my speech up with me. Once I got up there I was all right. I was still trying to catch my breath a little, while I started, but then I was okay.”

The Shining Star Award was the first time Azizdin was nominated for something at this level.

“It was awesome to have family and a lot of close friends there,” she said.

With a beaming smile on her face, Azizdin described the event as a “very energetic, fun — you know, just an amazing, glorious type of environment that day.”

Paying it forward

As the winner, Azizdin chose a nonprofit to receive part of the funds raised by the event. She chose the Junior Achievement organization because “it falls in line with everything I’m doing and trying to help out in the community with.”

Junior Achievement helps high school students prepare for the “real world,” through training in subjects such as financial literacy, work readiness and entrepreneurship, according to the Junior Achievement website.

“It’s kind of a training program to better them for their college careers,” Azizdin said.

Azizdin has been involved with the West Shore Chamber of Commerce since she started working for Central Penn, which was “about five years” ago. She isn’t involved directly with the Chamber, but is involved with several organizations that are a part of the Chamber, such as West Shore Young Professionals and American Business Women’s Association.

Azizdin plans to become more involved with the Chamber, after her experience. She loved the award process experience, as well as how the Chamber gives back to the community.

“I want to pay it forward, so, I might be serving on a committee for them, or something like that, in the future,” Azizdin said.

Central Penn College was well represented in the Luminary Awards. Sandra Box, associate director of the Central Penn College Education Foundation, was also a Shining Star nominee.

Cami Ressler, chair of the Education Foundation’s board of trustees, was a nominee for the Visionary Award, which recognizes a female executive community leader.


Sherri Long is president of the Knightly News Media Club @ Central Penn College.

To comment on this story or to suggest one, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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by | September 14, 2017 · 7:18 pm

Knight Owl always-open computer lab for students nests in Bollinger

By Brian Christiana, Amor Duran, Nasi Hayes, Katina Hocker, Laura Lee, Megan Smith, Quinyece Walker and Joel Zola

Students of COM 140, Summer 2017

Special to The Knightly News

In August, Central Penn College opened in Bollinger Hall what sources contacted for this story believe is the school’s first  24-hour, seven-day-a-week computer lab for students.

Students seem to like the additional resource, which includes 21 computers and a printer.

“It is great for the students that live in the apartments and Super Suites,” Student Government Association President Yuliani Sutedjo, a corporate communication major, said.

Valeri Hartman, IT help desk administrator, said the need for a new computer lab has been growing since the merger of the learning and writing centers at the start of summer term. The merger left students with only the library and Advanced Technology Education Center (ATEC) computer lab, in 300, neither of which is open past 10 p.m.

Because Room 41 was across from the Security Department, IT and other personnel saw a perfect opportunity to make the lab 24-7 access.

The lab is open on holidays, even though the college may be closed, Hartman said. Some resident students remain on campus on holidays.

“One of the challenges professors face is not having enough computers for students both in and out of the classroom,” Hartman said. “We’re trying to find a solution for that.”

Prof. Micaiah Smith-Morris said the Knight Owl Computer Lab is good, because a limit on students’ “time is no longer an issue.”

It is, “Clearly communicating an emphasis on academic achievement,” Smith-Morris said.

Bollinger 41 was selected as the location for the room because of its proximity to the security office. Hartman explained that with the lab being open all night, having the office across the hall will put students at ease no matter the time.

The location also provides convenience for on-campus students who will no longer have to walk cross campus to access a computer.

 

Working on extended support time

IT support is not available at the Knight Owl Computer Lab after 3 p.m. Help is available from the Central Penn IT helpdesk from 8 a.m. to 3.

Hartman understands that’s a problem that needs to be dealt with.

“We are working on it,” Hartman said.

Hartman gave some examples of what IT can do to fix the problem.

“Maybe some of the staff can stay later in the evening, till 8-9,” Hartman said. “It’s just a thought.”

She added there is no deadline for providing on-site IT support after 3 p.m., or whether doing so will be possible.

 

Equipment nuts and bolts

“The computers, monitors, keyboards and mice in the Knight Owl lab are all brand new and include three-year warranties on the hardware,” IT Director Tom Parker said.

IT workers had to re-cable all of Bollinger 41, which had been a classroom without student computers, so the computers could match up with outlets.

“A new network switch was added, and a wireless access point was also added to increase the density of available connections in the room,” Parker wrote in an email.

“The total cost per computer is $695,” according to Parker. “That includes the PC with three-year warranty, monitor, keyboard, mouse and the needed video adapter to connect the monitors.”

The total for computers and their accessories came to $14,595. Parker said the re-cabling, network switch, wireless access point and other accoutrements cost about $6,000. He said the approximately $21,000 spent on the lab came from the IT budget and did not require extra funds. Central Penn recently made fiscal cuts across the college to set a budget for the upcoming fiscal year.

The school tries to buy the same computers that are used in other rooms, but it’s not always possible because hardware changes every year. The computers in the Knight Owl lab are Dell computers and are similar to the 100 computers replaced in 2016 in ATEC, Parker said.

No work should be saved to the computer desktops because the computers delete information stored there overnight, as in the rest of the labs.

A security camera was installed in the room as well. If there are any technical issues overnight or on holidays, then students can submit a helpdesk ticket by emailing to helpdesk@centralpenn.edu  or by calling (866) 291-HELP (4357), and leaving a voicemail explaining what the issue is. Students can expect to receive an email answer during the following day.

Hartman suggested using the OneDrive account through Office 365, and to always log out when finished.


To comment on this story, contact TheKnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.Edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi, who directed this editorial project, and contributed a small amount of information to the reporting.

 

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