Monthly Archives: June 2017

Campus Bridge is a Link to the Future, and to the Past

By Destani Matthews

Knightly News Reporter

Central Penn College has been home to the 148-year-old Henszey’s Wrought Iron Bridge, a historic touch to the campus scenery, for over a decade.

This bridge has been one of the main attractions for not only prospective students, but the school’s surrounding community. The school’s former tagline that interweaved with having the historical piece is “Your Bridge to Success,” as well as making the school logo the outline of the bridge.

Henszey’s Wrought Iron Bridge is one of the historic treasurers on Central Penn's campus.

Henszey’s Wrought Iron Bridge is one of the historic treasures on Central Penn’s campus. Photo by Michael Lear-Olimpi

Former Central Penn College President Todd A. Milano bid on the bridge for just $22 from the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; he was the only bidder. Before giving bridges away, the state first seeks to improve and reuse its historic bridges.

“If it can be rehabilitated, we’ll rehabilitate it – that’s our preference, especially from a historic preservation perspective,” Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) spokesperson Kara Russell told structuremag.com.

According to historicbridges.org, the bridge is 92 feet long, 17 feet wide and 9 feet high. Patented by Joseph G. Henszey in 1869, and built by the Continental Bridge Co. of Philadelphia, the shape of the wrought iron (a tough, pliable form of metal made for forging instead of casting) bridge is both bowstring (the braided steel cable) and arch.

The main purpose of the bridge was to carry Main Street traffic over Trout Creek in Slatington, Lehigh County. It functioned for nearly 80 years, carrying cars and milk trucks – loads heavier than the bridge was meant to hold.

It was later replaced by another bridge and moved to Wanamakers, also in Lehigh County, where it served to carry lighter traffic until the bridge was again moved to Greiner Industries in Mount Joy, Lancaster County, for restoration.

On Jan. 16, 2001, the Pennsylvania Department of General Services informed Central Penn College the school held the winning bid on the bridge. The historic bridge was set up at the college on May 6, 2002. Part of the agreement of buying any of the bridges specifies that they must be restored to meet Pennsylvania’s Secretary of the Interior’s standards.

According to The Washington Post, it’s important having the Henszey’s Bridge on Central Penn’s campus, for historical purposes.

“Historically, truss bridges were made to be moved, so it’s still in keeping with their historic nature to move them,” Russell told the Post.

The bridge’s influence on the spirit of Central Penn continues through appearances in the background of numerous college photos and videos, and the bridge continues to offer a beautiful and functional connection on campus, a unique landmark that no other place in the country has.


To comment on this story or to suggest a story, contact the KnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Edited by media club coadviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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Don’t Stress Out!

Staff and students of Central Penn enjoy seven minutes

of free massage therapy to relieve midterm blues

By Sarayuth Pinthong and Fontaine McClure

Knightly News Reporters

There’s a strange pressure building on your shoulders and there’s just not enough time to think, much less continue studying for that exam. You feel like you’re about to explode with information overload.

Ugh! You say: “I just can’t stand it!

Calm down, take a breath and try to relax.

That’s what students, faculty and staff members did during free chair massages offered in the Advanced Technology Education Center during the midterm, and briefly during finals preparation.

Campus counselors Megan Cline and Candace Johnson arranged for Ian Thomas, a licensed massage therapy with The Roots of Health Central Pennsylvania Center for CranioSacral Health & Therapeutic Massage, in Susquehanna Township.

A chair massage is one in which a person sits in a chair, usually face-down, so a massage therapist can work on the person’s neck, shoulders and back.

The massages offered anyone who signed up an option to destress and relax from the tensions of projects, exams or activities of the day during the midterm.

“Usually three times a week during week 5 or 6 is when I try to offer the massage therapy,” Cline said. “Then again at week 10. That’s usually the time when I notice the most stress (in students) because students may have a lot of tests, or projects due.”

Some students may not recognize that they have built up stress or may not have an outlet to release stress. A person may be on edge and react quickly to things that normally wouldn’t bother him or her if the person weren’t stressed out, according to Cline.

Students speak about stress

“I worry about grades, work, scheduling conflicts and life outside of campus and work,” Angel Carrion, business management and human resources student, said. “Everything just piles up.”

Cline says studies back up the benefits of massage.

“Research shows that massage therapy is stress and anxiety reducing,” she explained. “That’s the number one reason I have this as an event for students.”

Along with massage therapy, there are other ways to manage stress.

“A student has to figure out what is relaxing to them,” Cline said. “It’s different for everyone. It’s finding out what those coping skills are for you.”

Ian Thomas, the licensed massage therapist from The Roots of Health, who volunteered to provide the chair massages, said.

“I think that it’s really helpful,” he said. ”There are definitely some stressors here and sometimes self-care takes a backseat.”

Listening to music, going to the gym and taking naps are some coping skills that could help to relieve stress, according to Cline.

Any student experiencing stress needs to find someone or something to use as a positive outlet.  Holding stress inside could be a negative and dangerous situation for a person. Also, stress released the wrong way at the wrong time can cause problems – an increase stress, in the long run.

“For anyone that doesn’t really use stress management or have any strategy to cope with stress, you notice that they may not be doing well in class,” Cline said. “It can be a snowball effect to not do well in school. We’re offering them an opportunity to help relieve that stress and focus better.”

If you are experiencing stress or want more information about stress and how to deal with it, contact Cline at 717-728-2416 or megancline@centralpenn.edu or councelor@centralpenn.edu


To comment on this story or to suggest a story, contact the KnghtlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

 

 

 

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A New Way to Connect: Single Sign-On Student e-Portal

After logging onto a computer, students can access Blackboard, email and other areas

 By Morgan Littleford

Special to the Knightly News

In spring 2017 term, Central Penn College changed the way students get into their online service portals, by putting all student services accessible online in one place.

As of early April, student log-in is easier, with Blackboard, student email and the main sign-on portal in the same place, so students and faculty can type in one set of credentials – after logging onto a computer – and find everything they need in one spot, instead of signing into different areas of the portal separately.

Single sign-on for student services accessible through the Central Penn student-services portal has eased students' access to services and tools they need.

Single sign-on for student services accessible through the Central Penn student-services portal has eased students’ access to services and tools they need.

“The portal was made for security reasons,” Information Technology Administrator Valeri Hartman said.

Of course, certain students on campus didn’t like the change. They did not see a reason for a switch to the new portal. In their opinion, why fix something that’s not broken?

Well, security is a significant reason, according to Hartman.

Because of the change, Blackboard went down on several occasions, which rarely happened before when Blackboard stood alone, but was most likely because of “bugs” that had to be worked out, Hartman said. The system was working smoothly by the middle of the term.

The change also inconvenienced some students who had to change passwords to access the new service, and some couldn’t remember the new password – but that is something that happens when passwords must be changed, for routine security updates. If someone does forget his or her password, then the person has five opportunities to sign in with the correct password before the system locks.

Some students didn’t mind the change.  They found it convenient for everything to be in one place. They don’t have many passwords or log ins – it’s one sign-in username and password, and then they have access to everything they need. Students have said that they enjoy the new portal because it is quicker and easier to get into their email, classes and other tools.

“Overall, the new system is great and extremely helpful,” student Eliz Milanes said.

Students will always have different views on change at the college, but they can count on the administration to make things better and easier for students in the college.


To comment on this story, or to suggest a story idea, contact the KnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

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Athletic Director Dave Baker Among Guests on Final Spring Podcast

Baker talks about the future of the Central Penn Knights sports programs

By Paul Miller

Knightly News Co-Adviser

With the term coming to a close, the Knightly News Podcast releases Episode #29, our final podcast for the spring term.

In this episode, we feature Athletic Director Dave Baker and a return segment from former Senior Deputy Attorney General of Pennsylvania Jon Butchar.

In our opening segment, Baker discusses several initiatives for the Central Penn Knights sports program, including the new track and field team that starts in January 2018, the potential of a new sports complex, and a recap of the Central Penn Knights Men’s Baseball team and their run to the Small College World Series.

The podcast is also joined by Knightly News Vice President Yuliani Sutedjo, a manager for the Lady Knights Basketball team, to offer her perspective on life as a student athlete.

Baker is currently recruiting for the new track and field team.  If you are interested in further information, reach out to him at davebaker@centralpenn.edu.

In segment two, former Senior Deputy Attorney General Jon Butchar joins the podcast to discuss some very important international issues.

During this discussion, Butchar gives an overview into our history with North Korea and offers a clearer picture as to why there is hostility between North Korea and the United States.

The Knightly News would like to thank the supporters of our podcast, as we’ve had the highest listener rate in the history of the podcast during the spring 2017 term.

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Giving, and Receiving, Therapy — The Special Way

PTA students spend time with Special Olympians

Story and Photos

By Sarayuth Pinthong

Media Club Reporter and Photographer

MECHANICSBURG – About 50 Central Penn College physical therapy assistant (PTA) students, along with others from five area counties, participated in a Special Olympics event held at Messiah College, in April.

For the students, being a part of Central Penn’s PTA program provides opportunities they normally wouldn’t have in class. The Special Olympics event, consisting of around 1,150 athletes, was a chance to engage with special-needs individuals or “buddies.”

Central Penn PTA students withe their Special Olympics buddies.

Central Penn PTA students with their Special Olympics buddies.

“It exposes our PTA students to those with special needs in a playful environment while allowing them the chance to participate in an event that challenges their skills,” Prof. Jacki Rothschild, academic coordinator of clinical education at Central Penn College, said.

Students in various stages of the program learned from the event. Some students were surprised when they arrived on Messiah’s campus.

 

Working in the field

“It was a little overwhelming at first,” said Jordan Reichard, second-term PTA student.

Reichard was experienced working with kids, but the event presented new situations for him.

“I couldn’t communicate the way I normally would,” Reichard said about meeting his deaf “buddy,” referring to the buddy system approached used during the event, in which college students and Special Olympics students were one another’s “buddies,” or companions.

Reichard said he was able to connect with his “buddy.”

“At first, when I would kneel down to talk to her, she would move away,” he said. “By the end of the day, I got used to her mannerisms. She was a lot more comfortable, which made me more comfortable.”

Rewards for Reichard included allowing him to witness the importance of support for the athletes and their families.

“No matter who the patient is, there’s always a way to connect with them,” Reichard said.

 

A rigorous program

The PTA program is intense. Students spend many hours studying to complete it. But classroom learning always allow the best insight to what happens outside the classroom.

PTA students learned from their buddies.

PTA students learned from their buddies.

“My ‘buddy’ challenged me to step out of the physical aspect of therapy,” Amanda Harris, a PTA student in her last term, said. “My professors were diligent about being creative on reading your patients.”

Being able to adapt is important when connecting with patients.

“It’s good to have a plan,” Harris said. “But each person responds differently to different forms of communication and learning.”

She added that every situation is different and “you need to be ready to change.”

A good time, too

The event provided more than learning opportunities. Students collected memories they’ll carry long after the event.

“The didactic work that our students experience is one thing,” Rothschild said. “Our students take their buddy, the experiences they’ve collected, and carry it with them into future endeavors, creating a bond between the students and the Special Olympic athletes.”

A good Central Penn turnout for the Special Olympics at Messiah College recently.

A good Central Penn turnout for the Special Olympics at Messiah College recently.

Despite the challenges involved in meeting an individual for the first time and adapting to possibly extreme situations, the Central Penn PTA students were able to create memories with their buddies, while also having fun.


Sarayuth “Sy” Pinthong is the media club’s secretary and photographer/videographer.

To comment on this story, or to suggest a story idea, contact the KnightlyEditors@CentralPenn.edu.

Edited by media club co-adviser Prof. Michael Lear-Olimpi.

 

 

 

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