Monthly Archives: November 2015

Jekyll and Hyde – and Hyde and Hyde and Hyde: The Stage is Set

By Christine Fusselman

Media Club Reporter

Murder! Mystery! Mayhem!

This steampunk version of the Victorian era Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde novella by Robert Louis Stevenson, playing in the Capital BlueCross Theatre in The Underground Nov. 19 and 20, promises to be unlike any you’ve seen.

Dr. Jekyll is confronted by not one, but multiple facets of his own alter ego in this adaptation by Jeffrey Hatcher.

Director Janet Bixler, theater director and Central Penn faculty member, says she chose to use the steampunk style because it is a way to add elements of science-fiction from the industrial age, along with fun and creative costumes and staging.

Steampunk is a theatrical costuming and literary science fiction and fantasy genre that combines Victorian-era clothing and contemporary or old-looking mechanics, usually operated by steam.

“This [adaptation] adds a level of intrigue to the original in the way that he adds multiple Hydes,” Bixler says. “It becomes a more community story than a story of one man. Using four actors to play multiple roles symbolizes how gray our moral compass is and heightens the level of science fiction.”

Some of the players will be switching characters without switching costumes, making for quick, short scenes, according to Bixler. She says the play is very action-driven, yet very poetic.

Referring to this adaptation versus the original, Bixler says, “It has the same intention, but Hatcher broke it down to the essence of determining for oneself where you are on the (morality) spectrum of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.”

In this scene, Tyler Willis plays a surgical student who is trying to avoid the wrath of Dr. Carew, played by Paul Whitman. Dr. Carew is angry with Dr. Jekyll, played by Frank Butcher.

In this scene, Tyler Willis plays a surgical student who is trying to avoid the wrath of Dr. Carew, played by Paul Whitman. Dr. Carew is angry with Dr. Jekyll, played by Frank Butcher.  Photo by Christine Fusselman.

 

Sharing the stage with community members

Auditions were held in August and students, alumni and two community members were cast. When some of the cast left due to scheduling conflicts, two more community members were added, both of them experienced actors.

“I love the fact that the play calls on most of the actors to play more than one role,” says Paul Whitman, one of the community actors. “For years now, I’ve been an avid fan of Victorian melodrama as portrayed in BBC TV productions, so I’ve had huge fun trying out a cockney accent for Mr. Sanderson, the personal enquiries agent, and an Irish accent for the police inspector. It makes me wish I had taken to the stage a long time before this.”

Whitman added: “The blend of community members along with students has been great fun.”

Criminal justice student and actor Teta Gaye, 20, said she likes the community involvement.

“I feel like everything works much smoother and faster,” Gaye says “Central Penn College students should get involved more because of the opportunity, experience and the fun.”

Besides Gaye, the cast includes Central Penn students Tyler Willis, Alexis Ensley-Gregg and Jessica Grice. Besides Whitman, community cast members include Frank Butcher, Bob Zaccano and Anthony Geraci.

This scene depicts some of the same actors in different roles. (l to r) Teta Gaye is playing Poole, seated next to her is Paul Butcher as Jekyll, behind Butcher is Paul Whitman in the role of Enfield, and on the far right is Bob Zaccano as Utterson. Photo by Christine Fusselman.

This scene depicts some of the same actors in different roles. (l to r) Teta Gaye is playing Poole, seated next to her is Paul Butcher as Jekyll, behind Butcher is Paul Whitman in the role of Enfield, and on the far right is Bob Zaccano as Utterson.
Photo by Christine Fusselman.

It takes a village

“Although there are one-person shows, no production could be successful without a crew,” Bixler says.

The crew for this show includes Central Penn Students Daniel Blichasz, tech manager; Danielle Farber, stage manager; Jaida May-Woodfolk, crew; and Ashley Walker, house manager.

Community theatre member Mandi Lea Hurley is the dresser and steampunk subject-matter expert, and Aaron Lute, is the Central Penn Central technical support specialist to round out the crew.

If you go

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde will begin at 7:30 p.m. Nov. 19 and 20. Tickets cost $7 general admission and $3 for students.

Tickets will be available at the box office. They can also be purchased online at http://www.centralpenn.edu/college-services/capital-bluecross-theatre/.

That page also has information about the Capital BlueCross Theatre.

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Central Penn Student Government Elections Are On!

By Norman Geary

Media Club Reporter

Elections for Student Government Association officers for 2016 will run until 4 p.m. today.

Christine Fusselman, 47, Corporate Communications, and a member of Inter-Society Club, Media Club, International Student Club, Gamma Beta Phi and Central Station employee newsletter student reporter, is making a call to action for all Central Penn students.

And her message is clear: Come Out and Vote!

“I think everyone should vote and have a say of who is in office for the Student Government Association,” Fusselman, also SGA delegate at large for continuing education, says. “I don’t believe everyone realizes that, as a student, they are members of the SGA. I believe the students currently participating and running for the seats in SGA are doing a great job, but it would be great to see more students involved, both in the election and the organization. SGA does not necessarily require much time.”

Fusselman says it is important to have more representation from Central Penn’s diverse student body.

“Being a part of SGA is one way that students – whether they are traditional, online or continuing education – can share their voice,” she says. “If students want to create change, they need to get involved by actively participating in SGA or sharing their suggestions and concerns to SGA and by voting for students who are willing and able to be that voice of change.”

Students cite a variety of reasons for being apprehensive about getting involved with campus activities.

“I think that many students on (the) Central Penn campus don’t get involved because they don’t know enough about the clubs,” Catherine Davis, 18, Criminal Justice, says.

Davis is also a member of the Central Penn Women’s Soccer Team and the Drama Club, and a Writing Center assistant.

Criminal Justice major Samantha Moyer, 18, says students may be shy.

“I think that many Central Penn students don’t get involved because they don’t know anyone, so they are shy,” says Moyer.

Central Penn has an activities director, theater director and other professionals who organize events for students, but student government representation plays a potent role in programming.

“Central Penn College offers a good number of activities for students,” Fusselman adds “They vary in their purpose; some are just for fun, and others are a learning experience, but usually are a good time too.

”The potential for more activities and opportunities is there through more feedback and commentary from students. SGA and club organizers use this information to improve campus life.

“My involvement on campus allows me to understand where I can make an impact,” says Sebastine Virella, 19, Business Marketing and Management, and candidate for SGA president.

Yarisaliz Cales, Criminal Justice Administration, is the declared candidate for secretary and Tyesha Primer, Criminal Justice Administration, is the declared candidate for treasurer.

Voting is going on in the ATEC lobby, and online at https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/TFWXZHC.

 

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Men’s Soccer Season Over, But Aspirations Continue

By Nicholas Tschinkel

Media Club Reporter

The Central Penn College men’s soccer team closed its sophomore season amid cheering from one of its biggest crowds to date.  The match ended in a 5-1 loss to rival Williamson Trade, on Oct. 24 – Homecoming weekend.  The men’s game kicked off around 5 p.m. and was played under the lights of the East Pennsboro High School football stadium.

A Different Game, A Different Perspective

From a spectator’s vantage point, the men might not have appeared to fare much different than in their Oct. 18 game, which the Knights lost 4-0 to Berkeley College of New Jersey.  But to the players, the journey and growth of a new sports program were worth more than any scoreboard could ever tell.  “I’m proud of you boys,” Head Coach Tom Birch said in a postgame huddle. “You guys have guts.”

After my last article on the team, I was welcomed as a player for the final two games of the season.  From the first night at practice, it was obvious: This team is determined to be the best it can be. The players want the developing soccer program at Central Penn to continue for years to come.

Several nights a week, the team convened at the soccer fields behind the East Pennsboro Middle School for practice sessions. Each evening would begin the way any college soccer practice would, with an abundance of running and stretching.

A Fresh Approach

What was noticeable right away was how much the team reflects on prior matches. One of the first practices I attended found the team huddled together on the steel bleachers along the sidelines.  Both coaches stood as the players looked on from the bleachers, at first, listening intently to what Birch and Assistant Coach Andrew Welker had to say. Soon, the script was flipped.

The players were asked to talk about the match they had just lost. Each player was given individual time to voice positives and negatives of the game, and to offer advice on what could be changed.

This approach is novel.

Rather than Birch screaming at the men, critiquing each mistake they had made the day prior, as some coaches might, he let the players replay the story in their own words. He let the players see for themselves what needed to, and could, be fixed. He let them call the shots.

Over the course of the next week or so, the men took to the practice field with determination. One night would be run-heavy, and the next a myriad of passing drills and ball-maintenance puzzles.

One evening as players arrived for practice, Birch informed them he would be leaving to go scout some high school soccer games with Welker. This left the team with a bag full of practice equipment and no directions.

Rather than blow off practice, the men got straight to work with a team jog that culminated in a stretching circle. From there, the men practiced passing, attacking, shooting and defensive drills, all things that could help in their attempt to win the upcoming Homecoming game.

This determination to learn from their mistakes and become better one practice at a time echoes the nature of what it means to be a member of the Central Penn men’s soccer team: They work hard, they are dedicated to improvement and they constantly move forward as a cohesive unit toward a college sports program that functions well.

The Knights confer with their coaches. It was a tough, but full-throttle, season. “You guys have guts,” Coach Birch told his team.

The Knights confer with their coaches. It was a tough, but full-throttle, season. “You guys have guts,” Coach Birch told his team.

Working on The Mechanics

By the time the Homecoming game against Williamson Trade rolled around, the team was prepared to give the Mechanics its best effort.

The day began with the team cheering on the Central Penn women’s soccer team, as the ladies took on SUNY Delhi. (The Lady Knights lost 9-2.)  At halftime of the women’s game, the men’s team took to the practice field and began to warm up, working on passing drills. This gave both coaches the opportunity to run through the game plan and discuss the starting lineups.

All the running drills had paid off. An otherwise daunting hour-long warm-up session went by smoothly, because the players were in peak physical shape. All they wanted was for that opening whistle to sound, and to get the ball moving toward Williamson Trade’s side of the field.

After the National Anthem and starting lineups were broadcast over the loudspeakers, the match was underway.

The action started off competitive, with a good back-and-forth for the first 15 or so minutes of the game. Williamson Trade knocked first, scoring one on goalkeeper Jesse Berger.  A hard sod sent the ball bouncing all over the field. It would be difficult to maintain possession and make decisive moves during the game.

It became clear from the start that the so-called 50/50 balls – a soccer ball by itself that two players have an equal chance of getting to first – would be a major factor in determining who would win the game.

By the end, Williamson Trade came out on top, with a 5-1 victory, but not before a red card (Williamson Trade) and multiple yellow card penalties (both sides).

Shoulders to Wheel Honed the Team

Even though they lost, the hard work and skill of the men on the Central Penn soccer team cannot be accurately represented by a score, or how many shots were taken at the goal. Each player has his own individual story, but as a whole, the men on the Central Penn soccer team have overcome adversity. They stuck with a new program, even when there were not enough players to field a full 11-man roster.

They played matches without any substitutions. They lost every game except for one. And yet, they kept coming back day after day to train and to be better.

Why?

It is because the men of the Central Penn soccer team are driven not just to be the best they can, but also because they are laying the pathway for the future of the men’s soccer program at Central Penn College.

Without the tenacity and never-quit effort of the players, the future of the team would look bleak. Fortunately, the future looks promising, as scouting is underway.

Moving Onward

Both the coaches and the players look optimistically toward next season, when they hope to be not just as good, but more competitive, in the United State Collegiate Athletic Association.

“There were plenty of bright spots we can look back upon,” said Knights defender Greg Walker. “I think the belief is there and next season we will be looking to take the next step as a program.”

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Alumni Brews Tent Big Hit with Alumni

By Norman Geary and Kris Ortega

Media Club Reporters

feast-and-brews-wooden

Fall Harvest featured a new event, Alumni Feast ‘N’ Brews, on the Summerdale campus as part of Homecoming on Oct. 24.

The celebration began at 11 a.m. with Harrisburg street band No Last Call playing “Give Up the Funk” by the Parliaments, a late-’50s and 1960s band popular in the 1970s as the Funkadelics, started by manager and owner George Clinton, who developed a new music genre called P-Funk and later was called funk rock.

Brass band No Last Call plays Photo by Kris Ortega

Brass band No Last Call plays “Give Up the Funk”
Photo by Kris Ortega

Things have definitely changed since then, but alumni who gathered to reunite with old friends and to meet new ones went with the flow, and had a good time.

Trying something new 

The event was the first of its kind at the college, with alumni and their families enjoying refreshments that included alcohol. Catered foods were also served. Local craft beer providers, including The Brewery of Hershey, Zeroday Brewing Co. and Pizza Boy Brewing Co., all owned by Central Penn alums.

The Alumni Feast 'N' Brews had a delicious, German-style buffet. Photo by Kris Ortega

The Alumni Feast ‘N’ Brews had a delicious, German-style buffet.
Photo by Kris Ortega

 

“I feel like I’m at a Penn State game,” attendee Jill Zeigler said. “The Conference Center was not here and the auditorium is new. Kathi Hall (now our library) is different. There were five of us that roomed in one dorm.”

Since graduation, Zeigler has worked for the U.S. Department of Defense.

“We come to Fall Harvest every year and the event is really nice,” Zeigler said.

Susan Roscioli welcomed a return not only to Central Penn, but to the area.

“The reason why I attended Central Penn (is) I wanted to attend a school in the local area,” Roscioli said. “I have been working at North Hampton Community College for four and a half years.”

Will she come back with her friends to Fall Harvest?

“Definitely!” she proclaimed. “This is the one time during the year we get together as friends.”

Christine Fusselman, Sarah Dick and Amanda Rodriquez enjoy beverages at the event. Photo by Kris Ortega

Christine Fusselman, Sarah Dick, and Amanda Rodriquez enjoy beverages at the event.
Photo by Kris Ortega

Change was a big draw

The consensus among alumni was they enjoyed the Fall Harvest Feast ‘N’ Brews celebration.

“I love it! My favorite is the Blueberry Pomegranate (beer selection by Brewery of Hershey),” said Sarah Dick, ’15, legal studies.

Would she be returning next year?

“Of course, especially if you have beer!”

She has been working for a law firm since graduation.

Building legacy

Success stories were a recurring theme among alumni.

“I have been at Schmidt Kramer for eight months and Professor Teplitz  pulled for me – she lobbied for me to get the job,” said Amanda Rodriguez, ’15. “ My niece is graduating from Hershey High School and I am pulling for her to come to Central Penn. There are a lot of changes here: The … Medical Building was not here. I will be definitely attending next year.”

 

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Student Players Delight Youngsters at Fall Harvest

By Kimberly Crone

Media Club Reporter

 

Once again, members of the Central Penn Players Drama Club demonstrated their acting chops when they performed the play Mysterious Golden Rose during Fall Harvest on Oct. 24.

The children’s play is an annual event, and as always, the Central Penn Players did not disappoint.

As children sat on the floor in front of the stage, the performers delighted spectators of all ages in the Capital BlueCross Theatre on campus. In addition to running among the audience members, the cast also interacted with the children during the performance, which prompted some hilarious responses.

Although the kids were energized throughout the play, several were tongue-tied afterward when asked about their favorite part or characters, but other spoke right up.

“The two girls were my favorite,” young audience member Jamel said.

He was referring to Annabelle and Anastasia, played by actors Teta Gaye and Jaida May-Woodfolk, respectively.

Danielle Farber, Daniel Blichasz, Teta Gaye, and Jaida May-Woodfolk share a laugh with the audience.

Danielle Farber, Daniel Blichasz, Teta Gaye, and Jaida May-Woodfolk share a laugh with the audience.  Photo by Christine Fusselman.

The play, written by the Central Penn Players Drama Club and inspired by classic fairy tale books, was about two friends who question whether the mysterious golden rose they discover is magical, after they face a series of peculiar adventures in Fairyland.

Daniel Blichasz, who played the roles of the troll, dragon and tree, was ecstatic after the performance. As the troll, he frightened Annabelle and Anastasia at first, but by the end of the play, he had achieved the thing he was searching for – their friendship.

“It went wonderful,” he said. “All the actors were energized. We brought it to the table, and the kids enjoyed it.”

Tyler Willis, who played the knight, agreed.

“It went spectacular,” he said.

Cast member, Tyler Willis, answers a question for an audience member during the post-show question and answer session. Seated next to him are (l) Ashley Walker and (r) DaShawn Godfrey.

Cast member, Tyler Willis, answers a question for an audience member during the post-show question and answer session. Seated next to him are (l) Ashley Walker and (r) DaShawn Godfrey.  Photo by Christine Fusselman.

Professor Janet Bixler was pleased with the children’s play as well as with the Pennsylvania Regional Ballet, members of which had performed earlier in the day.

“Today’s been going really well,” Bixler said following Mysterious Golden Rose. “The Pennsylvania Regional Ballet put on a contemporary number and two ballet pieces. The dancers ranged in age from 7 to teenagers. We had almost a full house for them. The kids’ play was high energy.”

Bixler said the Central Penn Players are proud of themselves, and that they should be because of the hard work they put into the production.


 

The Cast

Annabel – Teta Gaye

Anastasia – Jaida May-Woodfolk

King – DaShawn Godfrey

Knight – Tyler Willis

Mysterious Stranger – Ashley Walker

Troll, Dragon and Tree – Daniel Blichasz

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Central Penn College Homecoming Crowning

By Jasmine Harvey

Media Club Reporter

 

On Oct. 24 as part of the Fall Harvest Festival, Central Penn College crowned their Homecoming queen and princess.

Sawthi Saradha and Jaida May-Woodfolk were the candidates, with both having to pick a non-profit organization to raise money for. Saradha was crowned homecoming queen, choosing the International Red Cross as her organization. Saradha said, “ Being a queen I’m excited because I never had this experience before.”

GEDSC DIGITAL CAMERA

Jaida May-Woodfolk (left) and Sawthi Saradha (right) both enjoyed the experience of Homecoming.

Jaida May-Woodfolk was crowned homecoming princess, with her organization being NorthWest Victim Services. May-Woodfolk  said, “ It’s a humbling experience, the whole process itself.  It was (an adventure) whether I was queen or princess.”

GEDSC DIGITAL CAMERA

The contestants received a beautiful bouquet of flowers and a thunderous ovation from the crowd.

Both organizations that May-Woodfolk and Saradha supported received donations that will continue to help them serve their mission.

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