You DO Have Time For This! Incorporating Video into Your Classes

By Maria Thiaw, M.F.A., Professor, English and Communication

Every new technology has its benefits and its pitfalls, and throughout history, as new inventions have emerged, traditional industries have shown reluctance before coming to acceptance. Teaching, an ancient art, is no different. All of the new bells and whistles coming our way from CPC’s CTE can be overwhelming and under a challenging course load, learning new technologies can seem impossible. That being said, today’s students have been raised on multimedia and in order to lasso them long enough to get our points across, we need a 21st-century approach. This is why I was an early adopter of all that the CTE has to offer.  In the process of using the CTE to create videos through Screencast-O-Matic and the One Button Studio, I have learned a few things that have made using technology in the classroom easier.

First, you have to approach this with an open mind and understand that it is a process. Look at your schedule for places where you can squeeze in some practice time. Come in on a Monday or use one free hour during each day to learn how to use the programs. The biggest time commitment is in the beginning when you are learning. I found that it took a couple of days of practice, but they are very user-friendly and Kim and Judith were there to help. Once I mastered them, things went much faster. Now that I know how to use the programs, I find that I need about 2 – 3 hours to prepare a PowerPoint video for a class. 1 hour to prep it, 1 hour or less to record it and 1 hour to edit it. This is why it’s best to learn and plan over break, have a script ready, and plan time throughout each week to build your inventory of lessons. Notice the word I am repeating here is PLAN.

Secondly, you must edit your expectations. Don’t expect to have an entire class, let alone 4, completed over a two-week break. This isn’t a week long project; it’s a term-long project. It might take longer than that to feel like your class is perfect. Take your time and get through each lesson. Eventually, the class will be where you want it to be and you’ll be proud of it.

Lastly, don’t worry! You don’t need 44 hours of video, even if it is an online class. It is best to use a variety of teaching methods. Attention spans are short these days so think about keeping your videos less than ten minutes. If you are lecturing for an hour, you can break it up into five or six segments, which helps to promote student focus.

Now that I can handle Screencast-O-Matic, I can create and edit short videos at home.  Even under our intense schedule, with some planning and patience we can work some of these technologies into our pedagogy.

Context is Key: Using Films on Demand’s New Intro Video Feature

By Judith Dutill, Instructional Design Technologist

In online teaching, an important part of successfully using video for educational purposes is framing the video in the context of your lesson and learning goals by using annotations. When you embed a video (or any multimedia element) into an Item in Blackboard, you should include annotations that orient your students to the content of the video.

Effective annotations include:

  1. An overview of the video’s subject-matter
  2. Information on how the video aligns with your weekly or course-level learning objectives
  3. Specific information on what students should pay attention to in the video or an overview of what students should take away from the video
  4. A reminder for students to take notes, if necessary
  5. Insight on any related activities or assessments that will be conducted after viewing

 

Example Annotation
An Example of Embedded Videos with an Annotation in Blackboard

 

If you’re looking for high-quality video content for your classes, our library subscribes to Films on Demand, a streaming video platform that specializes in educational videos. Our subscription to Films on Demand can be accessed through the Charles “T” Jones Leadership Library’s Online Resources page.

Films on Demand allow users to bookmark videos, build playlists, and generate share links and embed codes to embed videos in Blackboard. Additionally, Films on Demand has a new feature that allows users to create 2-3 minute intro videos for their playlists.

Click this link to see an example of a Films on Demand Playlist with Intro Video.

Users can use intro videos to build continuity and cohesion into their courses, to provide brief instruction to students, and to put videos in the context of a lesson or learning goal. Using an intro video also adds instructor presence because it allows students to hear from (and see) their course instructor as they set the stage for learning.

If you are interested in learning more about this feature, check out the Films on Demand Support Center. Need help recording your first intro video? Contact the Faculty Support Center: facultysupport@centralpenn.edu.

Are you going to give this feature a try? Let us know how it goes in the comments section!