Monthly Archives: December 2014

Photography Submission: Dr. Melissa Wehler

At The Central Pen, we are committed to all types of art and artists, including the visual arts.  We believe that creative expression, no matter the medium, has an important place in our education and in our lives.   With that said, please enjoy the following submission by a member of our creative community.


About the artist.

Dr. Melissa Wehler is the Dean of the School of Humanities and Sciences at Central Penn College.  When she is not teaching writing, literature, film, or cultural anthropology, she is an avid photographer and fiction writer, including the co-editor for The Central Pen.


Falling Creek; Little Buffalo State Park

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Autumn’s Last; Little Buffalo State Park

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Spokes; Little Buffalo State Park

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by | December 6, 2014 · 8:14 pm

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: The Danger of a Single Story

You might know Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie if you have ever listened to Beyonce’s song “Flawless,” where the Beyonce sampled a portion of the author’s famous TEDTalk: “We should all be feminists” from April 2013.  The sample portion contains the most quoted part of the speech: “We teach girls to shrink themselves, to make themselves smaller. We say to girls ‘You can have ambition, but not too much’.”

Adichie is no stranger to tackling the tough issues when it comes to writing and politics.  In her July 2009 talk at TEDGlobal, Adichie talks about what she calls ‘the danger of a single story.’  Growing up, Adichie had only read books by British authors, and while she credits them with stirring her imagination and passion for reading and writing, they did not represent her or her native surroundings in Nigeria.  Eventually, she comes to find African literature (she names Chinua Achebe and Camara Laye as examples) that featured ‘girls with skin the color of chocolate, whose kinky hair could not form ponytails.’

Slide16However, while these narratives helped to reinforce what she knew to be true—Nigeria and Africa were places of rich diversity, complexity, culture, and history—that another, more simplified and problematic narrative about Africa and Africans was the one told around the world.  Through multiple experiences in the west, she learns about the ‘single story of Africa’ as a place of violence, poverty, hunger, and despair—images, she claims, comes from western literature and its colonial roots.

Listen and watch as Adichie creates her own narrative about the roles of reading and writing in personal and professional life and how they form narratives about peoples and places that shape our understanding of our global community.

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